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Thread: Quotes from TLOZ Link5 posts

  1. #46

    Default Second That

    Of note, I agree with Schadenfrau that the last quote in BrooklynRider's post is particularly good.

  2. #47
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    POSTS 1152 TO 1500:

    NYC infrastructure:

    2 Subway Lines (A and C) Crippled by Fire
    http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/sh...0849#post40849

    It takes MTA construction workers two years at most to renovate a station, while last century they might have been halfway done with building an entire subway line in the same amount of time.

    Almost every time I go to the West 4th Street IND station, the date of completion for the elevator they're installing there is pushed back another month. Meanwhile, when it rains, the leaky ceiling results in a veritable downpour on part of the uptown ACE platform.

    You could probably count on one hand the number of hours the construction workers are actually being productive in any given week.


    Grim Reaper falling on hard times
    http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/sh...9266#post39266

    In cases of violent deaths like homicides or traffic fatalities, there's one factor that I've noticed hasn't been acknowledged on these forums yet: the improvement in medical care over the years. Doctors and surgeons can easily treat a wound today that would have been considered fatal just a few decades ago. Note that assaults (this includes attempted murders that were prevented through self-defense or through the life-saving skills of medical professionals) have not declined to the same extent that murders have, both nationwide and citywide. Some criminologists theorize that, because of this, the barometer of crime statistics is no longer the murder rate, but the assault rate.


    Lost New York:

    Plaza Hotel
    http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/sh...0441#post40441

    The Plaza's plaza must have been grand back in the day. How weird that I regret the demolition of Penn Station and the Savoy-Plaza Hotel when I wasn't even alive to see them intact.

    It would be pretty interesting if some developer got the idea to replace the GM Building with a mixed-use supertall, with a 450-foot base that echoes the massing of the old S-P and a shaft that steps back respectfully from the streetwall.

    That's my flight of fancy for the day.

    25 Thames St - Downtown – Condo
    http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/sh...7617#post37617

    Agreed on the buildings north of 1 LP. In my opinion, U.S. Steel should have bought up that block instead of demolishing the splendid Singer Tower. A taller building there (obviously a potential building there would not have taken up the whole site) would have been an interesting juxtaposition to the former Twin Towers, and helped to integrate them into the skyline.

    The Mayflower Hotel
    http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/sh...6643#post36643

    Every time I see the GM Building, my stomach turns. The destruction of the Savoy-Plaza Hotel ranks up there as one of the worst moments in New York real estate history.


    Politics and respect for others’ views:

    The Presidential Election
    http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/sh...6423#post36423

    Unfortunately, "obtuse" and "redneck" is the stereotype for Bush supporters; it is not an impression that should be cultivated and is just as reprehensible as labelling all Kerry supporters as hippies, socialists, media pundits, PETA activists, homosexuals or the Hollywood elite. Voting for Bush because you feel there is a good reason to and that you can back it up with believable convictions is one thing, and can be respected (my father, for all his intelligence, level-headedness and sophistication, falls into this category). The same goes with those of us who voted Kerry.

    Yet there are the radically conservative, morally zealous, closeminded individuals who voted for Bush as a knee-jerk reaction because they feel threatened by more liberal, progressive values. At the same time, again, there are Democrats and others who fall into the same exact category; they just happen to be defined by a different primary color and have different social views.

    Voting for Kerry for no reason other than a disdain for rural/suburban America is equally as close-minded. There were many informed people who voted both red and blue, and at the same time many uninformed people who voted both red and blue. I love my family in Kentucky, even if they overwhelmingly voted for Bush. They are not obtuse hicks, but I still dislike their politics; it does not mean that I dislike them — we simply don't discuss politics because we find it divisive, and we love each other just the same and love visiting each other.

    Judging people by their vote, regardless of whether we find it misguided, is self-defeating and simply widens the rift that is already so palpable in this country in particular and the West as a whole. I can only hope that in his second (read last) term, that Bush can work to heal that rift, both at home and abroad.


    JB knew…

    Worst Ghetto/Project
    http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/sh...5081#post35081

    Red Hook has indeed improved greatly. At this moment, there probably isn't a single neighborhood in New York that isn't undergoing some sort of resurgence.

    That said, however, I can tell you from personal experience that it's a pretty good idea to watch yourself in certain neighborhoods, especially late at night.


    Common Sense:

    Ratner's Beekman Street Tower (Gehry)
    http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/sh...4025#post34025

    "Out of scale?" Hello, it's the Financial District/Civic Center! The Woolworth Building is three blocks away! Neighborhoods (and views, as I'm sure that this is the primary cause for opposition, at least for residents of that building on Nassau Street) change, for crying out loud; if you wanted stability in your neighborhood, then I would recommend that you move elsewhere.

    Yes…I wish we could

    The Forumers' Thread
    http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/sh...4027#post34027

    Might as well add my ugly mug to the mix...

    <picture link broken>

    My arms are outstretched because I'm supporting myself in the doorframe. But if you want to think I'm symbolically hugging the viewer, then go ahead. I've been told I hug well.

  3. #48
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    Nice work Allison!

    I really like this one too. We also have to be sensitive to space limitations, so this could fit nicely.

    Quote Originally Posted by TLOZLink5
    "If you love the place you live, love it with the same passion that so many New Yorkers do, then you'll learn to tolerate its imperfections if it hasn't been ingrained in you already. Be to its virtues very kind, but be to its faults a little blind."

  4. #49
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Great work from all here ...

    When looking for a quote for the plaque it seems we need to take into consideration the length of the text / number of words -- as we've gotten initial feedback from manufacturers that the lettering can't go below a certain size.

    The original quote on the flyer is about 175 words.

    The "cold? unfeeling?" quote is about 90 words.

    Depending on the size of the plaque that we are able to create we might have to go for fewer words.

    I'm supposed to hear back from one of the manufacturers today with more specifics and will up-date when I get the info.

  5. #50
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    This one is about 50 words:
    "If you love the place you live, love it with the same passion that so many New Yorkers do, then you'll learn to tolerate its imperfections if it hasn't been ingrained in you already.

    Be to its virtues very kind, but be to its faults a little blind."

  6. #51
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    I found a reference to that last line about virtues / faults HERE (scroll down) .

  7. #52

    Default Excerpts from Posts 1-500 and 2501-2700

    Name: J.B.
    Age: 18
    Location: Greenwich Village
    Birthplace: Upper East Side
    Interests: history, architecture, music, reading, writing, computers, video games (but I barely have time for it anymore)
    Random facts/talents: (recently changed) Junior at NYU, one older sister.



    Funny thing is, the trouble for me started when I got off the subway in Bushwick. Three guys were walking ahead of me and my friend, and they kept looking over their shoulders at us, as if plotting their next move to coincide with ours. It was obvious enough to my friend, who is from Washington Heights, that they were plotting whether to mug us, and even na ve little old me could tell something was off, too.

    On our way back to the subway, a gaggle of hipsters — there must have been 30 of them; why do they always travel in packs? — swarmed out of the darkness — there are practically no streetlights there — just as we reached the station. It was surreal.

    In most parts, Bushwick needs a lot of work. There's very little active streetlife like in the Village or even in Willimsburgh; truly residential areas aside, the dense concentration of warehouses create blank walls at ground level with little opportunity for retail without serious renovations: housing projects for hipsters. By comparison, I felt safer in Bed-Stuy because the area I went to was mostly rowhouses with front stoops, with a main commercial strip just a few blocks away.

    In any case, I don't judge Brooklyn by what happens in Bushwick, and no one with any sense would do that either. It's like judging Boston by what happens in Dorchester.


    I go out at night at least once a week in Washington Heights and take the A-train home alone well after two in the morning. I visit a friend in East Harlem regularly. I go to parties occasionally all over Williamsburgh and in Bed-Stuy. I hang out on the Lower East Side at times. I've been to block parties in the South Bronx. I went to Bushwick once, in 2004, and it's the only neighborhood in New York I've been to where I've truly felt unsafe — not just a slight buzz of paranoia that you get in a slightly edgy or unfamiliar neighborhood, but a serious, tingly oh-God-this-place-is-bad sense that I couldn't shake. I wasn't by myself that night, either. I'm glad to hear there's some improvement, but it's going to take several years of that before I ever consider going back there. At least the friend that I went to visit that night has since moved to Bay Ridge.



    Oh, so cultural diversity is when white people can live a comfortable distance away from the immigrants enjoy the benefits of their food and culture, but ghettoization is when they're too close for comfort?



    Been reading up on this lately and it gets me really pissed off...how wonderful to think that homophobes in this country who want to recriminalize homosexuality essentially want the United States to emulate what is now the most murderous country on Earth. That's right, Jamaica now officially has a higher murder rate than Colombia (which doesn't have any laws making homosexuality a criminal offense) or South Africa (which recently legalized gay marriage). In fact, despite all of the political turmoil there, even HAITI (which likewise doesn't make persecuting gay people part of the political agenda) has a murder rate that's a mere FRACTION of Jamaica's. At least Sean Paul has enough sense to stand up to the idiocy and tell his fellow countrymen to cool it.


    Dear Mr. Tierney,

    Though I have no shortage of respect for Landmarks, I cannot help but question the soundness of its decisions regarding the buildings that it has fought to preserve. During the Commission's attempts to save the Jamaica Savings bank, a nondescript brownstone adjacent to the Whitney Museum, and other structures of overall dubious architectural significance, many more distinguished structures are being bought up and replaced with banal developments at an appalling pace. I call your attention particularly to the plight of a group of attractive townhouses at 31-37 West 56th Street, which according to The Greenwich Group International are being purchased in preparation for the development of yet another luxury condominium tower. I implore you to look into this matter of concern, lest another elegant reminder of New York's past be replaced by a vulgar development that will only benefit the very rich people who build it and reside in it for a few months of the year at a time.



    A fond farewell to a role model of our times [Betty Friedan], who left just as we could use many more like her.

    "Remember me...but ah, forget my fate." [Purcell, Dido and Aeneas]



    The whole outdated perception of the city being crime-ridden definitely gets to me.


    Hopefully, the gods of good taste are trying desperately to stymie any and all efforts to make this building happen.



    Suck it dry, Robertson.



    I believe in the theory that life as we know it first came about when Gil Gerard built a time machine, went back to the Hadean Eon, and ejaculated into the primordial ooze.



    We at Baptists Are Saving Homosexuals have BASHed enough so-called "gays" with the blunt love of Jesus to know how to spot deviants across a crowded sale at Saks. Outside of Italian shoes, nothing sends up a rainbow-colored flare that you are dealing with a flaming homosexual more reliably than when a man breathlessly gushes the word "faaabulous!" When a Christian lady hears this word outside of her hair salon or florist, she instinctively reaches for the Bible tracts in her purse because she knows a nancy boy is within throwing range.
    . . .

    Therefore, conservative Christians throughout the land have become increasingly uncomfortable as they dutifully mask each awkward pause with a flurry of polite applause and yells of "more wars!"*during President Bush's somewhat laborious attempts at speaking. While Tony Blair may have mastered the Queen's English, our President's vocabulary calls to mind any number of queens' English. Even our least vigilant Republican social commandos have noticed that Mr. Bush has been peppering his otherwise delightful litany of patriotic jingoism and pleasantly embroidered CIA-intelligence recaps with the effeminate mating call "fabulous" -- three giddy syllables that are tantamount to coyly cooing, "Hello, sailor!"



    I'll never stop loving Canada. I can't get mad at a country that's given the world poutine, the Barenaked Ladies, Sarah McLachlan and most of the good comedians on this continent...and all is certainly forgiven re: Tom Green.

    And if it's not too much trouble, please burn down the White House again before 2008.


    ::sings::

    O Lord, won't you buy me a Mercedes-Benz?
    My friends all drive Porsches; I must make amends!
    Worked hard all my lifetime, no help from my friends.
    O Lord! Won't you buy me a Mercedes-Benz?



    But seriously...I loved the Twin Towers because of their sense of presence. Approaching the city after a trip out of town, you'd see them loom over the horizon before the rest of the skyline came into view, almost as a gesture of welcoming you home. Although lacking in architectural grace, they had perfect massing and symmetry and their twinnesss was what made them unique (is that an oxymoron?). They were the defining feature of the skyline of the Financial District, and to people around the world they were symbols of America—even if to us they were symbols of half-hearted, '60s-era efforts at urban renewal.

    The towers are gone because of their symbolism, but the ideals they represented still endure. It was their loss that sparked my interest in tall buildings, the history of New York, and an overall renewed appreciation for my home. Even though the term is now extremely clich&#233;, after 9/11 I loved New York, my home, more than ever. I still do.



    Most neighborhoods in New York are safe, just so long as you take certain precautions that you might take in Vegas, or LA, or Chicago. *Very few people would ever attempt to accost you during the day; most homeless people are generally harmless and will probably bother you just ask you for some spare change. *At night, if you're wary about walking around, be sure to avoid side streets—one-way crosstown streets generally fronted by walk-ups—as much as possible, and stay in well-lit, well-travelled areas with lots of other people around. *And if you feel that someone is following you, it helps to start acting crazy if they get too close for comfort. *Believe me, this works; just start thrashing around and scream incoherent phrases, like "The bees! *The bees!", or something of that nature. *New Yorkers generally back off if we think you're psychotic.

    The subways are safe during the day and relatively safe at night. *If you do take the subway at night, stand far from the edge of the platform and ride either in the front car where the driver is, or the middle car where the conductor is. *It's a general consensus that you shouldn't ride in the rear car of a subway train during off-peak hours.

    Other than that, there's very little to be afraid of, provided that you also look both ways before crossing the street. *Have fun, and have a safe trip!

    Last edited by ManhattanKnight; April 19th, 2006 at 10:14 AM.

  8. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by ManhattanKnight

    The towers are gone ... but the ideals they represented still endure. It was their loss that sparked my interest in tall buildings, the history of New York, and an overall renewed appreciation for my home. Even though the term is now extremely cliché, after 9/11 I loved New York, my home, more than ever. I still do.

    I really like this one (edited slightly).

  9. #54
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    ^ I agree!

  10. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1
    "If you love the place you live, love it with the same passion that so many New Yorkers do, then you'll learn to tolerate its imperfections if it hasn't been ingrained in you already.

    Be to its virtues very kind, but be to its faults a little blind."
    I really can't imagine anything would be more perfect than this.

  11. #56
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schadenfrau
    I really can't imagine anything would be more perfect than this.
    I really like this one too.

    I'm also very fond of the three choices made by BrooklynRider, but particularly the "Cold? Unfeeling?..." quote. This is my favourite, I think. Passion mixed with humour. Perfect.

    And I agree that the "I'm all for revitalization..." quote would be just right for a Harlem garden plaque.

  12. #57
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Please check HERE for up-date following our meeting today with NYRP.

  13. #58
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    I have to thank the quotes team for the work in this thread. In addition to fulfilling our objective, this thread has really made me feel closer to JB and inspired to succeed. It makes me a lot more thoughtful in my posting, when I see the thoughts he put forth. I have also changed one behavior definitely in response to this tragedy. I always give to anyone begging on the street. I keep getting pulled back to that being his last willful act. It is so simple and so powerful. I get the brain flash each time I'm about to pass, "what kind of person do you want to be remembered as...."

    It has also really made me sadder that he is gone. Having read these quotes over and over and using them to try to motivate potential donors and reporters has made me just absorb so much of him. I'm doing my volunteer work this weekend with people dealing with grief and loss and I had a wall of emotion roll over me today thinking of those headlines, "They laughed." It was a good cry with people who "got it." I'm glad we have people in this community who get it too. This is a very special thread.

  14. #59
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schadenfrau
    "If you love the place you live, love it with the same passion that so many New Yorkers do, then you'll learn to tolerate its imperfections if it hasn't been ingrained in you already.

    Be to its virtues very kind, but be to its faults a little blind."
    I really can't imagine anything would be more perfect than this.

    That one is just perfect.

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