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Thread: 188 Ludlow Street - Lower East Side - by Costas Kondylis

  1. #31

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    I luv Katz's Pastrami. Yes, it's overpriced, but what in NYC isn't nowadays. Big question: Do they own their building? Maybe they could build a platform over Katz's, and build up from there. They could nuke the rest of that block with no noticable effect.

    Quote Originally Posted by MidtownGuy View Post
    I couldn't care less about Katz's specifically... hot dogs and pastrami are gross IMO... I'm a lifelong vegetarian.

    Still, some tourist is probably sitting in there right now enjoying his/her sandwich, so let's not hate on Katz's too much. It still beats another bank branch.

    Any meat eaters out there have an opinion on Katz's food, and it's worthiness to live on?

    Based on recent trends, I'd be willing to bet the ground floor of this new building won't have anything nearly as interesting as the historic deli across the street.

  2. #32

  3. #33
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    ~ 20 degrees outside today and these guys were pouring concrete slabs up top ...

    It's up to 15 floors now.

    Here's what the backside facing towards Essex Street looks like ...

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  4. #34
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Just to the rear (the south side) of this building, they've cleared three, one and two-story buildings (180/182/184 Ludlow St.) for a new 18-story hotel.

    The DOB permits show H. Thomas O'Hara as the architect of record.

  5. #35
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    Goodbye to all the bars, restaurants, and shops that made this neighborhood interesting enough to get on the subway to visit.

    Ironic, the demand for million dollar condos in an avant garde neighborhood will destroy, 3 buildings at a time, what lured them there in the first place: interesting and unique businesses in an environment so different from midtown. Now I love midtown, don't get me wrong (I live here) but I do not want to see the Lower East side look like what the stretch of 2nd avenue in the 50's is becoming. We used to have so many lovely businesses. Bakeries, charming small restaurants, etc. Even the last laundromat closed down recently.

    Every Manhattan neighborhood will look the same in 5-7 years.

    These new buildings market themselves on the novelty and 'downtown' aesthetic at the same time as carving it away piece by piece.
    Of course, it has nothing to do with height...it has everything to do with expensive but ugly buildings that don't look as good as the tenements they replace, bases configured in a way that prevents any retail diversity, and exclusionary prices that homogenize the population.

    It was fun while it lasted, Ludlow Street.

  6. #36
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
    Just to the rear (the south side) of this building, they've cleared three, one and two-story buildings (180/182/184 Ludlow St.) for a new 18-story hotel.

    The DOB permits show H. Thomas O'Hara as the architect of record.
    Finally, curbed got a hold of the rendering for this one (180 Ludlow St.) and surprisingly, it isn't half bad...


  7. #37

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    hahah...I worked there 7 years ago when it was known as yavakovski paper, the owner was a pedophile who was involved with Jewish charities who brought boys from the former soviet union to the states and they stayed at his apt on first ave
    Last edited by Eugenious; September 6th, 2008 at 12:42 PM.

  8. #38
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    And a sick time was had by all?

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by stache View Post
    And a sick time was had by all?
    yeah there was this poor kid from Ukraine Illya he would say that depending on what he would do the guy would pay him more and buy him a nice cell phone etc. the kid had to go back to Ukraine so he was trying to make as much money as possible...

    and that bastard sold the building for $10m a few years ago so imagine how many young boys he can get now?

  10. #40
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Default 180 Ludlow Street

    Developer Seeks to Convert Stalled Hotel Project into Rental Building



    Lawyers representing developer Serge Hoyda went before Community Board 3 last night, outlining plans to convert 180 Ludlow, a stalled hotel project, into a residential building. In a wrenching decision for CB3's land use, zoning and housing committee, members tentatively signed off on the proposal.

    Ordinarily, developers are called on to set aside a certain number of apartments in new residential developments for low and medium income residents. But, given the economic realities, Hoyda's attorney, Jessica Loeser, explained, "we are here right now because we cannot continue as a hotel," and she added, "we cannot find a bank that will finance (a residential building) with an affordability component."

    Hoyda has already applied for a variance with the NYC Board of Standards and Appeals. The Community Board's approval is not required - but would bolster his application with the city.

    The committee reluctantly signaled its support for the conversion, in part, due to a novel proposal from the developer. "In an act of good faith," Loeser said, "Serge is willing to offer, or kind of donate, five apartments to be affordable. He is doing this without any government program. He is doing it without any government incentives as an act of good faith, understanding the importance of affordable housing."


    Committee members proposed an alternative that would make it possible for Hoyda to provide more than five "affordable" units by permitting residents to use federal housing subsidies. In a resolution that passed 6-1 (with 3 abstentions), the committee agreed to support whichever arrangement is a better deal for the community.

    A final vote will take place at CB3's full board meeting next Tuesday. By that time, Loeser said, Hoyda's accountants will have crunched the numbers. The resolution details a number of other concessions: a stipulation that no bar or restaurant selling liquor will be allowed in the ground floor retail space, that a meeting room will be made available for community events, that Hoyda will look to hire local construction workers and contractors and that residents in Community Board 3 will have the first shot at the "affordable units."

    Hoyda bought the building site at 180 Ludlow in 2007, reportedly for $100-million. This is what his web site (via Curbed) said back then about the plans for 180 Ludlow:
    Hotel Ludlow will be a new, nineteen story, independently-run boutique hotel, featuring 170 guest rooms including several large suites, a signature restaurant, a basement spa, a fitness center, a business center, a sun deck and an exclusive rooftop lounge.
    Last night, Loeser said there were many complications that caused construction costs to skyrocket. The foundation had to be excavated and a new foundation built. And contractors had to work around a very shallow subway tunnel. Then, as Loeser put it, "the world changed. The ground kind of opened up under a lot of people," when the economy collapsed last year. When the financing dried up, Hoyda was forced to pay a steep termination fee to the firm hired to operate the hotel. "What he's trying to do," Loeser said, "is close up the site, make it safe, bring construction jobs into the community, bring street life back to Ludlow Street. There are two other sites right in that area that are also stalled construction. This is a way to "un-stall" this construction."




    The conversion plan calls for creating 158 units, all rent stabilized. There would be some one and two bedroom apartments, but mostly studios. The studios would rent for $1200-1300. Loeser said, "this is not a luxury building. This is a market-rate, no frills building. It's not obscene and it's not affordable. It's somewhere in the middle." Explaining why they're in such a bind, another Hoyda representative explained, "the years in which people were paying inflated prices for market rate rents that allowed developers to produce affordable units in their buildings are past us."

    There was some opposition to the proposal last night, specifically from Joel Finegold of Good Old Lower East Side (GOLES), the affordable housing advocacy organization. He said, "there is an affordable housing crisis in this neighborhood. People are being displaced on a massive scale. We're all familiar with this, and this is an opportunity to create a tremendous number of affordable housing units." Loeser responded, "If you can find us a way we'll do it, but we cannot find a bank that will finance it with an affordability component."

    A committee member and affordable housing advocate, Mary Spink, summed up the difficult choice before the board. "As much as I would like everything to be affordable to the community," she said, "the building was being developed by a market rate developer. It's very very difficult to get financing. It's not like it's sitting there and some government agency is going to say 'here community, take it over.' So (the alternative is) it sits there and it's empty, and it continues to be a problem, which it has been in the past, for the block -it's a difficult decision to have to make."

    http://www.thelodownny.com/leslog/20...80-ludlow.html

  11. #41
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Default 180 Ludlow

    Tough Questions For the Owner of 180 Ludlow

    It was a tough afternoon for developer Serge Hoyda at the Board of Standards and Appeals. As we’ve reported in the past, he wants to convert 180 Ludlow, a stalled hotel project, into a 20-story residential rental building. Commissioners were skeptical of the proposal, saying he should have anticipated construction problems on the site (above a subway tunnel) long ago. There was also testimony from some rather displeased neighbors, including the owners of “The Ludlow,” the luxury building next door. But Hoyda had his defenders. Among them: the LES Business Improvement District and business owners such as Josh Tupper of Russ & Daughters. In the end, the BSA asked for more information and tabled the issue until April.

    You may recall Hoyda lost his financing for the hotel when the economy went south and construction costs mounted. The new plan, outlined for CB3 last October, is to convert the shell of a building to a “no-frills” market-rate apartment complex with ground floor retail. The application before the BSA asks for a “rear yard variance,” necessary to comply with New York residential construction regulations, the attorneys argued.

    One of Hoyda’s lawyers, Marvin Mitzner, said the Community Board had offered its “overwhelming support” for finishing the project and removing an eyesore from the neighborhood. He also submitted letters of support from Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, Senator Daniel Squadron and former City Councilmember Alan Gerson. But commissioners took exception to his contention that the unexpected costs were all tied to the presence of the subway tunnel and problems with the existing foundation. They suggested engineers should have known they would not be able to use the foundation – meant to support 100-year old tenement buildings – and that a new foundation would be required.

    The reasons for the cost overruns are critical. If the BSA concludes the project failed, not due to “unique circumstances,” but because of the economic downturn or bad decision-making, they are unlikely to approve the variance. One commissioner said, “this kind of seems like a problem you created on your own” by not anticipating problems. Mitzner countered that in 2007 when the site was purchased, “the clock was ticking, air rights had been purchased, contracts were signed.”

    During the hearing, an attorney for 176 Ludlow, the tenement building just to the south of the stalled hotel (and the home of Max Fish), spoke out against the project. Referencing a lawsuit involving the two buildings, she said 180 Ludlow’s architects want to put large exhaust units on the roof of the tenement building and install interior and exterior fans in 10 apartment units. David Rosenberg, representing “The Ludlow,” said it was “nonsense” to build a 20-story hotel on an old stone foundation and he asserted this project “never made economic sense.” Linda Bielik, an attorney speaking for “Ludlow Concerned Citizens” weighed in as well, saying 180 Ludlow is out of step with the character of the neighborhood. She noted new zoning regulations restrict building height on Orchard Street to 80 feet.

    But the commissioners heard another point of view, as well. David Suarez of the LES Business Improvement District said it was in the neighborhood’s interest to finish the building. He said small businesses are anxious to have the kind of daytime foot traffic a new apartment building would provide.

    Josh Tupper of Russ and Daughters, Deb Weiner of “Sugar, Sweet, Sunshine” and a manager from American Apparel echoed his sentiments.They also said the hulking shell of a building is not appealing to either residents or visitors.

    But commissioners made it clear they want more information before ruling, including additional engineering and financial reports. They also asked for clarification on the financial impact of a commitment Hoyda made to CB3 – to provide five units of affordable housing in the building. Hoyda’s team said they needed about three weeks to pull together the requested documents.
    The application will be considered again by the BSA in April.

    http://www.thelodownny.com/leslog/20...80-ludlow.html

  12. #42
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    Ludlow has been ruined. It used to be a fantastic street.

  13. #43

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    I haven't seen any activity at the site. They have parties in the empty shell of this building.

    Aesthetically, it's bad news that this is going to be an affordable residential building designed by O'Hara. Also, how will the dwellers react to all the noise.

  14. #44
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Right across the street at 179 Ludlow there's a shell of a thing being worked on by "Two Funny Guys LLC" for years now that just can't get finished. Construction hell on that block.

  15. #45

    Default Bad project

    Even tis bad project is better then the building situation at the moment.
    Last edited by alexandrali; February 28th, 2010 at 10:03 AM. Reason: spelling mistake

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