View Poll Results: Pick just three buildings that best exemplify architecture as art:

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  • Guggenheim Museum (Wright)

    52 70.27%
  • Hearst Tower (Foster)

    30 40.54%
  • Seagram Building (Mies)

    21 28.38%
  • InterActiveCorp (Gehry)

    21 28.38%
  • Lever House (SOM)

    13 17.57%
  • New York Times Building (Piano)

    13 17.57%
  • TWA Building (Saarinen)

    39 52.70%
  • Scholastic Building (Rossi)

    3 4.05%
  • Museum of Modern Art (Taniguchi)

    10 13.51%
  • CBS Building (Saarinen)

    4 5.41%
Multiple Choice Poll.
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Thread: The Art of Modern Architecture in New York

  1. #61
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    Gruzen is now creating some of the typical brick/concrete low budget residential buildings in the city (see: Southtown).

    As for adding to the list, what about Tracy Towers? Sure, the plan is the same from bottom to top, but I still think it could qualify.

  2. #62

  3. #63

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    Not sure that's true, at least in the case of TWA. For instance, there's Calatrava's airport at Bilbao, also built to evoke wings. In fact, you could argue that Saarinen's TWA terminal appears to be an inspiration for a lot of Calatrava's stuff.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio
    The Gugenhiem and the TWA are great buildings certainly but they´re one-off pieces...oddities...their story pretty much ends with them.

  4. #64

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    TWA Terminal

    Guggenheim

    I'll add the Summit Hotel, now Doubletree Metropolitan (Morris Lapidus 1961)

    September 7, 2000, Thursday

    HOUSE & HOME/STYLE DESK

    Building Outside the (Gray) Box: A Legacy of Curves and Colors

    By BONNIE SCHWARTZ ( Interview ) 1197 words
    WHEN Morris Lapidus, who is 97 and architect of the iconic, mid-50's Fontaine bleu Hilton and Eden Roc hotels in Miami Beach and more than 1,000 other projects, was in town recently, he had lunch with his colleague Philip Johnson as well as his former clients, the brothers Tisch. Between lunches with friends and meetings with manufacturers to discuss licensing his product designs, Mr. Lapidus sat briefly in Central Park, recounting some of his most memorable New York projects and looking back on his life as a contrarian.

    Q: What was your most significant New York project?

    A: The Summit Hotel on Lexington Avenue [currently the Loews Hotel, now under renovation and scheduled to reopen as the Metropolitan Hotel]. When it opened in the 60's it was the most hated hotel in New York. New Yorkers couldn't stand it because I used so much color. People here like things gray.

    It was a beautiful, fresh and bright hotel. One critic said that you had to put your sunglasses on when you walked in. The exterior was bright, too, clad with multicolored terra cotta. It was a beautiful place. Inside, I designed Lucite furniture so it wouldn't look cluttered, as the lobby was very, very narrow. I used every trick I knew to make it an exciting place, but New York hated it. People poked fun at it, but it was a very successful hotel.

    Copyright 2002 The New York Times Company
    Lapidus died in 2001. Too bad he didn't quite make it to see his work landmarked.

    LPC gets one right


  5. #65

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    It would have made a more forceful statement if not for the unfortunately bland base.

  6. #66

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    And if it occupied the entire street to 3rd.

  7. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp
    TWA Terminal

    Guggenheim

    I'll add the Summit Hotel, now Doubletree Metropolitan (Morris Lapidus 1961)

    Lapidus died in 2001. Too bad he didn't quite make it to see his work landmarked.
    But at least it does survive. Its contemporary, 2 Columbus Circle, does not.

    Almost exactly contemporary, these two gems share a fit of ennui with orthodox modernism. But where Lapidus squeezes modernism’s vocabulary for what (little) decorative value he can find in its strictures, Stone the erstwhile modernist abandons the style completely. His building looked forward to what was to come –postmodernism-- (and thereby hastened its arrival), while Lapidus’ building is a baroque summation at the end of a line of thought.

    From http://www.thecityreview.com/hhart.html:

    Francis Morrone, an architectural historian, said that 2 Columbus Circle "may be the very best building ever erected on Columbus Circle.

    Robert A. M. Stern, the architect, told the gathering that the commission's refusal to schedule a hearing was "frankly inexplicable." The building, he declared, "stands outside the canon" and "it questions rather than answers."

    Anthony M. Tung, a former member of the landmarks commission, told the July 14th meeting that the failure of the commission to calendar a hearing on the building "is a gross dereliction of duty."

    Tom Wolfe, the author and journalist, said he spoke that morning with Huntington Hartford on the telephone. He said that Mr. Hartford, who is 98 years old, said that significantly altering the building was "a disgrace."

    ‘The "stonewalling" of the commission on this building is shocking and unexcusable. It is a lovely building designed by an important architect at a major site and has a substantial cultural history. It worked fine as a small museum originally and still can. The proposed recladding by the Museum of Arts & Design, formerly the American Crafts Museum, is not needed, inappropriate and not better than the existing facade.’ –Carter Horsley

    The Huntington Hartford will be sorely missed. The beginning of that arc of dismay will be the day its new façade is unveiled.

    * * *

    The poll is complete. A majority (more than half) of those polled think Guggenheim and TWA are art. Remarkable unanimity. And to top it off, Zippy picked them both.

    .

  8. #68

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    More than a year after this thread went dormant, the new New York Times Building languishes near the bottom of the list. Does this reflect current opinion, or now that the building's nearly complete, would we have a different outcome?

  9. #69
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    Places that quicken the pulse:
    - Lever House
    - TWA
    - My first impulse was Guggenheim, but instead here's the walk-through waterfall in the pocket park behind McGraw-Hill.




    Photo by Roving Rube at nycjpg

  10. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by 212 View Post
    Places that quicken the pulse:
    - Lever House
    - TWA
    - My first impulse was Guggenheim, but instead here's the walk-through waterfall in the pocket park behind McGraw-Hill
    - Box of glass
    - Curves of concrete
    - Curves of glass.

  11. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    More than a year after this thread went dormant, the new New York Times Building languishes near the bottom of the list. Does this reflect current opinion, or now that the building's nearly complete, would we have a different outcome?
    I think it would be different, not majorly but slightly better. Should have another poll on the times thread perhaps?

  12. #72

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    Quote Originally Posted by alonzo-ny View Post
    I think it would be different, not majorly but slightly better. Should have another poll on the times thread perhaps?
    45 have voted, and the poll is still open. There are plenty of members who could bump it up in the rankings.

  13. #73
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    My favorite postwar architecture:

    The Times Tower



    posted by Derek2k3 - http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/sh...=3379&page=175

    On my short list of greatest skyscrapers ever built, before or after the war.





    Lincoln Center



    http://www.lincolncenter.org/images/903_website.jpg








    Seagram



  14. #74

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    ^ They're about to ruin Lincoln Center. New York will lose the purity of its principal ensemble from the aberrant but interesting "classical" branch of Modernism. Currently out of favor, survivors from that school are dropping like flies. Some are victims of today's aesthetic prejudice (2 Columbus Circle, the Verizon recladding); others fell to Allah's wrath (the World Trade Center), while St. Vincent's Hospital (about to go) is a victim of both aesthetics and economics. The GM Building lost its sunken plaza (probably a good thing if you don't care about historical authenticity). And next ... Lincoln Center's overall integrity.

    In the future, if we want to see some of this kind of architecture unbowdlerized, we'll have to travel to Princeton to see the Woodrow Wilson School --or Washington for the Kennedy Center.

  15. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    Some are victims of today's aesthetic prejudice
    Care to elaborate on this "aesthetic prejudice"....

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