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Thread: 150 Greenwich Street - WTC Tower #4 - by Fumihiko Maki

  1. #2266

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    Goes without saying, but the street experience for Silverstein's towers is so much nicer than 1 WTC.

  2. #2267
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
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    11.17.13




    ©tectonic

  3. #2268
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Crit> Four World Trade

    Alan G. Brake looks around Fumihiko Maki's New York City skyscraper.


    Robert Polidori

    Fumihiko Maki’s recently completed 4 World Trade is the shortest, quietest, and most deferential of the four planned towers on the original trade center site. It may also prove to be the best. Its volumes—a trapezoidal shaft rising 57 floors, and a square tower pivoting above to 72 stories—reinterpret Daniel Libeskind’s masterplan, which called for spiraling towers ringing the site.

    Mr. Maki addresses the street even more deftly than the sky. Facing busy Church Street, he wrapped the building in a three-story retail base, which is articulated with steel fins giving it a human scaled presence at ground level. The retail base also connects to the transit center and retail below grade—all of which are currently under construction. (Adamson Associates are the project’s architect of record and Leslie E. Robertson Associates provided structural engineering.)

    The retail base wraps around to the north, facing the pedestrian extension of Cortlandt Street where it terminates in a notched entrance into the building’s serene lobby, which faces the new extension of Greenwich Street. Maki marks the transition from Cortlandt to Greenwich with a Japanese-inflected circular fountain lined with smooth river rocks. Facing Greenwich Street, the double height lobby overlooks the Memorial park, mingling commerce and commemoration with surprising subtly. (This smart urbanism is threatened by a the overly militarized security plan for the area, the subject of a pending lawsuit by nearby residents.)

    Inside the lobby, restraint reigns. The wall facing the Memorial is faced in polished dark grey granite, creating a reflective surface that brings some of the experience of the park inside the building. The floors are pale grey and the ceiling and columns—engineered to be as few and far between as possible—are wrapped in white, as are the two reception desks. A curving kinetic sculpture by Nishino Kozo, called Sky Memory, emphasizes the openness of the lobby. Two 45-foot-long curving arcs cantilever from the granite wall, nearly touching to make a half circle. The two arcs move gently in the wind, emphasizing the strength of the cantilever, but also the tension and fragility of the space, an apt metaphor for this emotionally loaded site. Maki indulges in a bit more material richness as visitors pass through the security gates. Three hallways leading to the elevator banks are wrapped in warm anigre wood panels all cut from one tree for perfect book-matching. Each corridor terminates in a wall planned for digital art, currently displaying semi-abstract pieces that evoke the wind, earth, and trees.



    The floor spaces are still raw and will be finished by in-coming tenants, which currently includes two city agencies. Still, Maki and his firm made a few decisions that will help set the building apart for perspective occupants. The building’s notched corners will allow twice the number of corner offices or corner conference rooms. The 57th floor set back allows for a large sky terrace, which will undoubtedly be one of the city’s premiere outdoor spaces. Aligning roughly with the crown of the Woolworth Building, the terrace is both high above and embedded in the city. It offers dramatic yet intimate views of the harbor and the surrounding buildings of Lower Manhattan and New Jersey.

    Left to right: Granite pavers; the reflective granite wall; Anigre panel leading to the elevator banks.

    As a private office building, most New Yorkers will only experience 4 World Trade from the exterior. While it is doubtful that this extremely restrained building will ever be one of the city’s most beloved, Mr. Maki and his team have demonstrated that excellent craftsmanship and precise specification can be applied at a large scale to create an elegant addition to the cityscape.

    Working with Israel Berger Associates, Benson Global, and R.A Heintges & Associates, Maki’s team selected a thicker than usual 3/8-inch PPG Starfire low-iron outer lite for the Viracon insulated glazing units (IGUs). The glass in each floor-to-floor IGU extends beyond the spandrel for minimal visual interruption. The shadow box spandrel is painted grey to further diminish its visibility behind the reflective glass. Two layers of laminated ¼-inch Viracon glass create a strengthened interior layer, protecting occupants.

    The resulting curtain wall is extremely flat, with minimal pillowing, and subtly reflective. Viewed from the Harbor, or from Brooklyn or New Jersey, the building is remarkably changeable in the light, with whole elevations sometimes appearing to merge into the sky. While the now destroyed World Trade Center was a blunt and emphatic statement at the tip of the island, Maki’s more ambiguous building encapsulates the feeling of our awakened, anxious times, and allows for both a return to business on the site with a deference for remembering what was lost.



    Detail of Sky Memory.

    http://www.archpaper.com/news/articles.asp?id=7033

  4. #2269
    Senior Member DKNY617's Avatar
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    January 17th, 2014





  5. #2270

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    Crain's
    January 29, 2014

    4 World Trade Center stars in Super Bowl ad

    The newest World Trade Center tower is the setting for a $16 million Bud Light ad with Arnold Schwarzenegger, Don Cheadle and a llama. "We have been fortunate," says an exec at landlord Silverstein Properties.

    BY DANIEL GEIGER

    The 72-story tower at 4 World Trade Center will take a star turn Sunday in a Bud Light Super Bowl ad starring Arnold Schwarzenegger. The building will be the towering backdrop in an elaborate two-part commercial that will also include Don Cheadle and a llama.

    According to a trailer for the spot, an "unsuspecting guy" is ushered to 4 World Trade Center in a stretch limo where he parties with "412 actors," "five rockstars," and "58 hidden cameras," in a night of adventure and mayhem that is supposed to embody Bud Light's catchphrase that it is the "perfect beer for whatever happens."

    Part of the ad will feature the former champion-body-builder-turned-Kindergarten-Cop-turned-governor-of-California dressed in a track suit and sporting a headband and shoulder-length locks readying himself for a ping-pong match. According to reports, Mr. Schwarzenegger was paid $3 million for his performance. Mr. Cheadle is also shown in a preview walking a llama into an elevator.

    The commercial was shot almost entirely in the 72-story, 2.3 million square foot building. An exterior shot of the tower itself is also briefly featured during the trailer, raising the possibility that it will have at least a second of screen time in the commercial that airs—giving the tower a moment in the spotlight during the most watched and most expensive block of television advertising of the year. According to reports, 30-seconds of advertising time during the championship game sold for $4 million, meaning Budweiser spent as much as $16 million on the minute and a half commercial.

    The spot is the most prominent promotion yet for the new office building. The property opened late last year and is largely occupied by the city and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which together lease its lower 30 floors. But the top half remains vacant.

    "We have been fortunate enough to host TV and fashion shows, commercials and events at 7 World Trade Center and now 4 World Trade Center," said Dara McQuillan, the chief marketing and communications officer for Silverstein Properties, the firm that built and owns 4 World Trade Center. "This is part of our efforts to raise awareness for the building."

    The Bud Light production crew shot the commercial in early January, renting four floors at 4 World Trade Center for a week, 57-60, including space for a pen made out of straw for the two llamas used during the shoot. Part of the space, the 57th floor, which features a large outdoor deck, had previously been used for filming for an upcoming version of Annie that stars actor Jamie Fox. 7 World Trade Center, another office tower owned nearby by Silverstein Properties, has also played host to film shoots. The business can be lucrative. Silverstein Properties charges $50,000 a day to rent out a vacant office floor in the buildings.

    ©2014 CRAIN COMMUNICATIONS INC.

  6. #2271

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    Can't wait to see this one, but not the game itself. I'll wait until they air in the days & weeks after.

  7. #2272

  8. #2273

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    If that doesn't get this building fully occupied by the end of the year, I don't know what will.

  9. #2274

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    Especially if they think that chicks who look like Minka Kelly will be there. Fun video.

  10. #2275

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    Wall Street Journal
    February 4, 2014

    Until the Tenants Come Home, World Trade Plays Host

    Office Tower Is Hopping with Parties, Movie Shoots and Fundraisers

    By JOSH DAWSEY


    The imposing 4 World Trade Center has 72 stories to climb.


    Downtown Alliance had its holiday party at 4 World Trade Center.

    Developer Larry Silverstein built 4 World Trade Center as a gleaming office tower and a signal of downtown's recovery.

    And since it opened last November, the building has been hopping—but not with office workers. Until tenants begin to trickle in, the glass-clad structure, designed by Japanese architect Fumihiko Maki, has been serving mostly as an elite event location—home to cocktail parties, fashion shows, movie shoots and unorthodox fundraisers.

    Organizers at the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation are expected to announce Wednesday one of the largest public events yet—a stair climb, scheduled for April, that gives people a chance to ascend 72 stories and drink wine at the top.

    "There's nothing like the view," said Lorraine Egan, the president and CEO of the Manhattan-based foundation. "It's something we haven't seen in a long time."

    At this point, the interior spaces have few flourishes. Concrete floors are connected by beams to an exposed ceiling, with pipes running across the span. But neither the relative rawness—nor a usage fee of $50,000 a day, per floor—has deterred some select renters.

    A Super Bowl commercial that included Arnold Schwarzenegger, Don Cheadle and a llama partying and playing ping pong was filmed inside the building. "It was a well-behaved llama," said Justin Moore-Lewy, the executive producer at HeLo, which produced the advertisement.

    Producers of an "Annie" movie remake staged a shoot on the 57th floor that included Jamie Foxx and the young Oscar-nominated actress Quvenzhané Wallis.

    The Bordeaux Wine Council held a tasting event in November. The Downtown Alliance threw a holiday fête to attract tech firms to the neighborhood. And the Municipal Art Society hosted a gala on the 68th floor.

    Mr. Moore-Lewy, the producer, said "it is a giant building where you can more or less do anything."

    Still, the lonely feeling is a problem for Mr. Silverstein. The building is about 50% leased, and both tenants are public entities—The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and New York City. Both are still building out their spaces, leaving largely empty floors.

    Developers are facing a challenge in renting all the new office space downtown, with some financial firms moving away and others shrinking. Mr. Silverstein would like to build three towers on the site, said Dara McQuillan, a spokesman for Silverstein Properties, who dismissed worries about finding tenants.

    "It always takes a couple years to lease up an office building," he said. "It's very unusual to build on speculation. Most developers find a tenant, secure financing and build. Larry's philosophy was 'if you build it, they will come.' "

    Mitchell Moss, an urban-planning expert at New York University, said he expects companies to eventually rent the space. The allure of the old World Trade Center site, combined with an expansive transportation hub at Fulton Street, a revitalized downtown and increasing numbers of neighborhood residents, will make the area appealing to corporations, he said.

    "It took more than a decade to finish getting the tenants for the first World Trade Center," he said. "Of course it takes time to fill a building."

    Silverstein Properties is currently renting three entire floors for private events—though bar mitzvahs and weddings are banned. Some charities, like Ms. Egan's, are using it free. If tenants fill the building, it will no longer be open for such events, Mr. McQuillan said.

    For one day in April, it will be bustling with activity. Ms. Egan's charity has used other venues, including Yankee Stadium and Chicago's Willis Tower. Climbers will pay $112 to climb the stairs, for an event the foundation hopes will raise $200,000. The wide staircases are lighted and air-conditioned, with resting platforms after every floor.

    "We've just been waiting for this building to open," she said.

    Copyright ©2014 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

  11. #2276
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    The original WTC buildings had artists as tenants in the early days when they first opened. Couldn't find high paying corporate tenants so they took what they could.

  12. #2277
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Even at the end, they had some artists as a subsidy. They died.

  13. #2278
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
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    ©tectonic

  14. #2279
    Fearless Photog RoldanTTLB's Avatar
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    Certainly getting there, even if this view will someday be blocked. In fact, other then the memorial side, this poor guy will be utterly surrounded over the next decade.

  15. #2280

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    I'm actually curious as to what'll happen to One Liberty over the years. More repaints? Reclad? or just a straight up demolition?

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