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Thread: Springtime In The Big Apple

  1. #46
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    Very nice photo brianac, I agree that is a great part of the city, I wish I made it over there more often. Living on the East side I don't get over to the upper West Side so often but I love it when I do. There is a great energy.

  2. #47

    Default Botanic Garden welcomes blossoms

    Article about the Brooklyn Botanical Garden, where MTG shot the above shots.

    Botanic Garden welcomes blossoms
    BY AMANDA COLEMAN AND JOYCE SHELBY
    DAILY NEWS WRITERS

    Brooklynites who were weary of winter's cold days and frigid nights aren't the only ones enjoying spring.

    The borough's beloved cherry trees are making the most of the warmer weather, too.

    "A gentle, moderate spring makes for a beautiful season. This has been a really good year for our cherry trees so far," said Patrick Cullina, vice president of horticulture and science research at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden.

    "The warm days and cooler temperatures at night mean once the trees bloom, the blossoms stay around longer," Cullina said.
    That's welcome news to the thousands of visitors who flock to the garden every year to celebrate the return of spring.

    The garden's magnolias, tulips and camellias are all in full bloom now. But for many visitors, the cherry blossoms are always the main draw. Last year, 75,000 people turned out for the annual Festival of Cherry Blossoms.

    "They're really beautiful, amazing," said Anna Furmanova, 28, a Brooklyn College student from Sheepshead Bay who was visiting the garden on Friday, her day off.

    Dr. Edward Ziff, 65, a professor at New York University's School of Medicine, said the blossoms were "spectacular. ... I've been coming here every weekend for the last month."

    Cullina said visitors who follow Ziff's example will find different blossoms each time they arrive. The garden's 220-plus cherry trees come in 40 different varieties, which begin blooming in late March.

    The season lasts about six weeks, with the peak for many of the trees coming the first weekend in May, when this year's Cherry Blossom Festival takes place.

    Right now, the higan cherries, which look like weeping willows with blossoms, are at peak. They can be found around the Japanese Hill-and-Pond Garden, along with the snow-white shirotae cherries, which produce a double-flowered blossom. They're also at peak.

    Still to come are the popular Kanzan cherries along the Cherry Esplanade. Those trees produce pink or magenta blossoms, hanging in clusters of two to five flowers each.

    The Botanic Garden Web site (www.bbg.org) provides a map for visitors who want to see how many trees are about to bloom or are at peak.

    Copyright 2008 New York Daily News

  3. #48

  4. #49
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    Midtown, where did you exactly go to take those aerial shots of CP? That is a simply breathtaking view and I will head to CP this week to try and snap some of my own.

    Thanks for posting all these great shots, as a fellow photography lover it is extremely motivational to see all this great work.

  5. #50
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    So what are you trying to say, Zephyr?

  6. #51
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    Woodmo,
    The aerials were taken from the rooftop of the Metropolitan Museum. They're having a Koons exhibit up there now, so it would be a great time for photos up there.

  7. #52

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    April 24, 2008, 12:45 pm The Brightest Bulbs on the Circuit, From the Tulip Man

    By Corey Kilgannon

    Video HERE

    It’s spring on the Upper East Side: The little dogs shed their cute sweaters, the sidewalk tables come out in front of Nello’s, and Park Avenue once again blossoms in botanical resplendence.

    For a brief few weeks, the tulips planted in the medians bisecting the avenue come into magnificent bloom. Is it magic? Is it some little old lady — blue of blood and green of thumb — tiptoeing out of her ritzy Park Avenue place with a watering can to coax the flowers?

    No, it’s Duke Sofield: plain-spoken, dirt-under-the-fingernails native of Flushing, Queens. Mr. Sofield doesn’t exactly ooze Upper East Side gentility, but he does have an elegant touch with the tulips. His company, Cityscape, is hired each year by community groups to care for the tulips, and other things planted in the medians’ shallow soil.

    And if you catch up to him as he tends to the traffic islands from the East 50s through the East 80s, he will tell you that growing tulips is generally easy, but then nothing is easy for a plant in Manhattan. There is car exhaust, dog droppings and road salt. There is the occasional homeless person sleeping in the flower beds.

    There is also something of a greenhouse effect that disrupts the tulips’ natural rhythms. Beneath the medians run the trains heading in and out of Grand Central Terminal, as well as steam pipes. They raise the soil temperature and cause the tulips to blossom earlier than normal, thus delaying what Mr. Sofield calls “The Show.”

    “It’s a long time to wait for ‘the Show,’ and it only lasts a short time, but it’s worth it,” he said, while raking a patch of tulips on East 68th Street.

    He’s in his glory this week — a lot of praise from passers-by — but that won’t last long. When the tulips wilt, he will replace them with begonias for the summer season.

    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/20...the-tulip-man/

    Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

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    Quote Originally Posted by MidtownGuy View Post
    Woodmo,
    The aerials were taken from the rooftop of the Metropolitan Museum. They're having a Koons exhibit up there now, so it would be a great time for photos up there.
    Thanks a lot.

  9. #54

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    One amazing image after another, MidtownGuy. In fact I'd call some of them revelations.

    Those tulip pics are so Platonic they look like graphics.

  10. #55
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    thanks, ablarc

    All over town cameras are clicking away at the endless marvels of New York in this special time. The light has been amazing.


    It makes the tulips and daffodils explode with color at midday. People were in Bryant Park yesterday in a state of bliss...


    And last night I had the loveliest dinner with friends at "Via Delle Zoccolette"
    a charming Italian restaurant in the East Village where there was live music and delicious food. Spring means dining outdoors again, and that makes me very happy



    I'm ending my work for the day and going out to snap some more. Maybe I'll cover more ground on rollerblades....

  11. #56

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    Wow! Bryant Park looks amazing.

    I miss it.

    Great pics MidtownGuy! Looking forward to more.

    -ben

  12. #57
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    The new part of Riverside South was still mostly closed off.

  13. #58

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    You've done it again MTG.

    Made my day showing how beautiful my favourite West Side is.

    Riverside Park looks great.

  14. #59

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    Absolutely stunning.

    Great pictures MTG!

    -ben

  15. #60

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    And last night I had the loveliest dinner with friends at "Via Delle Zoccolette" a charming Italian restaurant in the East Village where there was live music and delicious food.
    Just noticed MTG's reference to "Via Delle Zoccolette," or "Street of the Pretty Girl." This also happens to be a restaurant that I regularly visit when I am in New York. For me the seafood/pasta combinations are a particular delight, with that Venetian touch in the ingredients and seasoning.

    I was told on several occasions that this was not a very good restaurant, but obviously I ignored that advice.

    btw - your photos are quite exceptional.

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