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Thread: Bayonne Bridge in Need of Replacement - Designed by Othmar Amma with Cass Gilbert

  1. #76
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Talking NY wants what NJ has

    Extending Light Rail across Bayonne Bridge to Staten Island is on minds of officials on both sides of Kill Van Kull

    Thursday, January 13, 2011
    By CHARLES HACK
    JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

    With plans afoot to raise the roadway of the Bayonne Bridge, New Jersey Transit is considering a future expansion of the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail over the bridge into Staten Island.

    Two weeks ago, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey announced plans to raise the bridge's roadbed by 64 feet to provide the 215-foot clearance above the Kill van Kull needed for new super-sized container ships to pass underneath it.

    Dan Stessel, a spokesman for NJ Transit, confirmed yesterday there have been discussions about extending the Light Rail from the Eighth Street Light Rail Station in Bayonne - which is slated to open within a month - to Staten Island.

    "Our involvement has been providing technical data to the Port Authority," Stessel said. "Any significant expansion of the Light Rail beyond the Eighth Street Light Rail Station would require further study to address capacity constraints."

    Those constraints relate to whether the existing infrastructure - which includes two rail tracks, one in each direction - could handle additional trains and riders that an expansion to Staten Island would bring, he said.

    Port Authority spokesman Steve Coleman said it is far too early to say whether or not incorporating a rail line into the bridge is a realistic proposition. Political support for a rail extension across the bridge seems stronger in New York than New Jersey.

    Sen. Charles E. Schumer, D-N.Y., and Staten Island Borough President James P. Molinaro say that providing space for the Light Rail or an express bus lane on the bridge would cut Staten Island residents' commute to Manhattan and reduce congestion.

    Sens. Robert Menendez and Frank R. Lautenberg and Gov. Christopher Christie could not be reached for comment.

    "My main priority right now - as it has been over the last several years - has been to raise the Bayonne Bridge to meet the height requirements of the supertankers to preserve 250,000 jobs," said Rep. Albio Sires, D-West New York.

    "My two main priorities at this time concerning the Light Rail are to extend the line to Route 440 in Jersey City and the Meadowlands Sports Complex and Xanadu Meadowlands mall."

    Bayonne spokesman Joseph Ryan said that Mayor Mark Smith would support extending the Light Rail into Staten Island, but it's a question of who would pay for the extension.

    http://www.nj.com/news/jjournal/bayo...540.xml&coll=3

  2. #77

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    Don't say I didn't tell ya so

  3. #78

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    THE DAILY

    Wednesday, January 26, 2011 02:23 PM
    Article View: Single Page | Multiple Pages
    Expert: Port still a driver, but land shortage, Bayonne Bridge could be issues
    By Evelyn Lee
    COMMENTSEMAILPRINTSEND A LETTER TO THE EDITOR

    The Port of New York and New Jersey continues to be an economic engine for the region, but major challenges lie ahead as it face future growth and other changes in the industry, stakeholders said Wednesday.“The challenge in the port is, can it react as the world moves ahead?” said George Kelley, chairman of Elmwood Park-based Langan Engineering & Environmental Services, speaking at a Newark Regional Business Partnership forum in the Brick City Wednesday morning.
    The Bayonne Bridge. (NJBIZ file photo)

    Cargo volume at the port has doubled between 2001 and 2010, while exports have increased 19 percent, partly as a result of the devaluation of the dollar, according to Richard Larrabee, director of the port commerce department at the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey, who also spoke at the event. The port supports 1.8 million jobs, and has added 100,000 jobs in the last 15 years, he said.“We’re still talking 4 to 5 percent growth for the foreseeable future,” Larrabee said.

    The port also is the nation’s leading port for automobile import and export trade, accounting for 66 percent of the U.S. market and more than 2,000 direct and indirect jobs, said Gary Love, vice president of sales and marketing at FAPS Inc., an automotive logistics firm.
    Shipping activity at the port, meanwhile, supports 270,000 total jobs and $36 billion in business income, according to Joseph Curto, president of the New York Shipping Association.

    With the port expected to receive the larger Post-Panamax ships following the completion of the Panama Canal expansion in 2014, “we want to make this port a larger distribution center than it already is,” he said. “There’s a great opportunity we see to bring big distribution centers to our area.”

    But the port region currently has a shortage of distribution facilities, Kelley said, as “right now, there is no land” where new warehouses can be built, so better land-use practices should be considered. FAPS, for example, has reduced their land holdings in the port region by 50 percent and surrendered the property to the Port Authority, a move made possible by its use of high-rise systems for storing automobiles.

    Kelley also said he was concerned about whether the Bayonne Bridge raising project could become another ARC tunnel, and not be completed on time and at cost.

    “I don’t think there’s any question the bridge will be dealt with,” although the completion of the bridge raising may not coincide with that of the Panama Canal expansion, said Curto. “In 2016, 2017, we’ll probably be in really good shape.”

    While the Port Authority already has committed $1 billion to the project, Kelley asked if the bridge raising could ultimately cost more than that.


  4. #79

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    By raising the bridge by at least '16-17 I think this region should be in fine shape. Of course some port activity would be lost, but I don't think 3 years would be catastrophic the way 10 years would be.

    Plus, aren't they expanding the marine terminal in Bayonne?

  5. #80
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    ^^Yes they are 66nexus. They are expanding at Porty Jersey in Jersey City and they have basically bought the MOTBY from developers and the city to add another port there.

    Will open a port, not new housing
    BLRA sells waterfront property to Port Authority for $235M


    by Al Sullivan
    Reporter staff writer Hudson Reporter
    Aug 04, 2010 | 1619 views | 0 | | 7 | |

    With the city on the brink of possible economic disaster, members of the Bayonne Local Development Authority voted on July 29 for what they say is the best deal they could get for development property they want to sell.

    They agreed to a $235 million contract to sell to the Port Authority approximately 130 acres of land at the former Military Ocean Terminal – essentially giving up on a redevelopment plan that once was expected to bring in billions of dollars.

    The original redevelopment plan would have brought 6,700 units of housing to three of the six waterfront development districts. Instead, the PA will probably turn those three districts into ports for containerized shipping.

    The city, which is short about $28 million from last year’s 2010 $135 million municipal budget – which ended on June 30 – was granted an extension by the state until July 30 to find revenue to fill that gap. Some of the money from the land deal can go to plug the hole. The vote to approve the Port Authority contract will give the city $40 million almost immediately, and another $100 million will come in over the next two years. The balance will be paid over the next 20 years.

    While the Port Authority announced the general outline of the deal in June, the BLRA, when voting last week, laid out many of the missing details.

    At the meeting, the public was not allowed to ask questions about the contract before the vote was taken.

    The Port Authority has tentatively agreed to pay the BLRA over 24 years to obtain title to the Hudson River property, together with permanent easements over the roadways on the MOTBY peninsula for operational and emergency use.

    The PA would pay no taxes on the property.

    Details of the contract

    While last month, the PA had said no decisions had been made for the use of the site, the contract with the BLRA makes it clear that the site is being considered for container port operations, and could become the key component in helping New York port operations deal with the expected larger container ships that will not be able to fit under Bayonne Bridge to access Ports Newark and Elizabeth along Newark Bay.

    In purchasing three of the six development districts, the Port Authority will assume responsibility for all improvements, environmental issues, and existing businesses – including the lease of Port Liberty, out of which Royal Caribbean operates a cruise ship operation. Royal Caribbean has 28 years remaining on its lease agreement.

    The BLRA will receive about $1.5 million of the current $4.5 million annually in port fees, and PA will receive the rest as well as rents and other fees from the approximately 38 businesses currently operating on the property.

    Will have to relocate two monuments

    Two monuments within the sale property will have to be relocated: One dedicated to U.S. Marines that shipped out from MOBTY to fight in the Korean Conflict, and the other the 100-foot Tear Drop 9/11 monument.

    Some public portions of the MOTBY remain outside the sale property and will be unaffected, such as the current pedestrian walkway along the south side of the peninsula closest to Route 440.

    Developers own other three parcels

    The agreement also leaves the door open for possible additional land purchases, even though the remaining three districts are either under contract or already sold.

    The agreement also gives the PA the right to build a road from the MOTBY to port roads just north of the MOTBY where PA already has port operations ongoing. This will allow truck traffic to enter and exit MOTBY.

    Once expected 6,700 units of housing

    Paul Werther, legal counsel for the BLRA, said the PA deal was far better than the six other proposals the BLRA received when requesting offers in 2009. He said the original plan to develop 6,700 housing units on MOBTY is an impossible dream in the existing economic climate.

    “The situation has changed since 2001 when the redevelopment plan was proposed, and we have to change with it,” he said, noting that Bayonne is extremely fortunate that the land is valuable as a potential port. “If we were to continue to develop the original plan, the city of Bayonne would go bankrupt. That plan is simply not feasible.”

    But some are already protesting the chance. An attorney for Bayonne Bay Development, which purchased a portion of one district for housing development; has already put the BLRA on notice that by permitting container port operations, it will breach its development contract with Bayonne Bay.

    Residents have unanswered questions

    While residents were not allowed to ask questions before the vote, they were allowed to make comments.

    John Budnick told the commissioners they had made bad deal, pointing to deals made for other ports such as in Virginia. He also said that the BLRA should have leased the land, not sold it.

    While members of the Longshoremen’s Union applauded the sale, other residents said such as Neil Barton said it was a deal done with “a gun to [the city’s] head.”

    Barton said the city had received a good price per acre, but that this does not solve the fundamental fiscal problems the city faces, and will buy only a few years until the city faces fiscal ruin again.

    “I would take this deal, too,” he said. “But I would know that I have a gun to my head.”

    Louis Ripps said there were many unanswered questions in regard to the deal, but overall, the city would be better served with residential development rather than a container port. He said he he’d hate to think this moment marked “the death of Bayonne.”

    Since the city will have no oversight over the property once the sale is made, he said the BLRA should put as many restrictions in the contract as possible, such prohibiting waste transfer operations.

    Debra Noble, a resident of Avenue E who lives within a quarter mile of MOBTY, said she was most concerned about the lack of local oversight and the fact that the PA could purchase more parcels, allowing 24-hour-a-day operations to take place.

    Of the seven member BLRA commissioners, only five actually voted for the contract. James Pelliccio withdrew from the vote and all discussions because he has business interests involving the shipping industry. Ray Grieves, one of two council member representatives, said he was too new to the board to make an informed decision, even though he is in favor of bringing union jobs to Bayonne. Grieves was sworn in as council member on July 1 and appointed to the BLRA at the July 26 council meeting.

    The BLRA also voted to take part in the Hudson County Improvement Authority’s pooled Note Financing Program. The program will allow the BLRA to roll over $30 million in debt incurred as a result of a now-defunct deal with a development group called Fidelco for the once-anticipated housing development at the Harbor Station section of the MOTBY.

    The debt is due now. Rather than refinance at a rate of more than 6.5 percent, the BLRA can refinance the same debt through the HCIA for 2 percent interest, BLRA Executive Director Chris Patella said.

    Read more: Hudson Reporter - Will open a port not new housing BLRA sells waterfront property to Port Authority for 235M

    http://www.hudsonreporter.com/view/f...ry_left_column

  6. #81

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    I hope the PANY/NJ's recent credit rating reduction doesn't greatly affect the $$ for raising the Bayonne road bed. I only say so b/c I don't believe financing has been worked out (IIRC)

  7. #82
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    More discussions about making a Hudson/Bergen Light rail extension part of the Bayonne bridge project, many feel if not now, when they are doing $1 Billion in improvements to the bridge, then when?

    http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/201...rested_in.html

    This is the only realistic way, in the near term, to connect the Borough of Staten Island to the rest of the region via rail. The Light Rail could cross over the Bayonne bridge and run along the MLK expressway , it could serve the College of Staten Island and the Staten Island mall, and run along the West Shore expressway to the South shore. The Light Rail could also reactivate the North Shore railway, and take over the SIRT.

  8. #83

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    Port Authority Awaits Fed Decision on Bayonne Bridge Project

    Sunday, April 08, 2012

    WNYC

    By Janet Babin


    Port Authority officials are waiting to find out whether the federal government will allow a project involving the Bayonne Bridge to move through a faster permit process.

    The bridge, which links New Jersey and Staten Island, is inextricably bound to the future success of the New York Harbor.
    Upgrades to the Panama Canal means bigger ships will make their way through the channel and up the East Coast by 2014. But these mega container ships won’t fit under the Bayonne Bridge, which means they can’t enter New York harbor.
    The Port Authority is spending $1 billion to lift the roadway, so the ships can fit underneath. But there’s a time crunch. The bridge won’t be completed until two years after the Panama Canal is widened.
    Without the bigger cargo ships, the port industry is a risk of losing business to other regional harbors.
    Faster federal permitting and reviews could shave up to six months off the project’s timeline. “Every day that a project like this is delayed results in additional accruals of financial costs, and every day and week and month that we can eliminate saves the project and the region money,” Port Authority Director Patrick Foye said.
    President Barack Obama issued an Executive Order on Permitting and Federal Review last month. It was an idea he introduced during his State of the Union Address.
    “We were first in the nation to take advantage of the process,” Foye said.
    This will allow the Port Authority and other state agencies to designate projects of regional and national significance. Those projects, if approved by federal regulators, will be able to undergo concurrent as opposed to sequential reviews that would normally take months to complete. For example, the Order would allow approved projects to combine the process of an environmental review with an environmental impact statement.
    Critics contend the fast-track review process fails to allow adequate time to assess the environmental or community impact a project can have.
    Foye said the Port Authority will likely hear whether the Bayonne Bridge has been approved for the fast-track review process, within the next two months. He said construction on the Bridge is expected to begin early next year.


    http://www.wnyc.org/articles/wnyc-ne...ridge-project/

  9. #84

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    Quote Originally Posted by gundam00 View Post
    Port Authority Awaits Fed Decision on Bayonne Bridge Project

    Sunday, April 08, 2012

    WNYC

    By Janet Babin


    Port Authority officials are waiting to find out whether the federal government will allow a project involving the Bayonne Bridge to move through a faster permit process.

    The bridge, which links New Jersey and Staten Island, is inextricably bound to the future success of the New York Harbor.
    Upgrades to the Panama Canal means bigger ships will make their way through the channel and up the East Coast by 2014. But these mega container ships won’t fit under the Bayonne Bridge, which means they can’t enter New York harbor.
    The Port Authority is spending $1 billion to lift the roadway, so the ships can fit underneath. But there’s a time crunch. The bridge won’t be completed until two years after the Panama Canal is widened.
    Without the bigger cargo ships, the port industry is a risk of losing business to other regional harbors.
    Faster federal permitting and reviews could shave up to six months off the project’s timeline. “Every day that a project like this is delayed results in additional accruals of financial costs, and every day and week and month that we can eliminate saves the project and the region money,” Port Authority Director Patrick Foye said.
    President Barack Obama issued an Executive Order on Permitting and Federal Review last month. It was an idea he introduced during his State of the Union Address.
    “We were first in the nation to take advantage of the process,” Foye said.
    This will allow the Port Authority and other state agencies to designate projects of regional and national significance. Those projects, if approved by federal regulators, will be able to undergo concurrent as opposed to sequential reviews that would normally take months to complete. For example, the Order would allow approved projects to combine the process of an environmental review with an environmental impact statement.
    Critics contend the fast-track review process fails to allow adequate time to assess the environmental or community impact a project can have.
    Foye said the Port Authority will likely hear whether the Bayonne Bridge has been approved for the fast-track review process, within the next two months. He said construction on the Bridge is expected to begin early next year.


    http://www.wnyc.org/articles/wnyc-ne...ridge-project/
    So are they going to add trains with bridge construction or no if approved??

  10. #85
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    High Above the Water, but Awash in Red Tape

    Long Review of Bayonne Bridge Project Is Assailed

    By SAM ROBERTS


    Michael Kirby Smith for The New York Times
    The reconstruction of the Bayonne Bridge in progress.


    It seemed ingenious at the time: Elevate the deck of the existing Bayonne Bridge to accommodate the giant cargo ships that will begin passing through the Panama Canal in 2015 after the project to widen and deepen it is scheduled to be finished. Building a new bridge or tunneling under Kill Van Kull would have been much more expensive and would have required years of regulatory reviews.


    Michael Kirby Smith for The New York Times
    A close-up of the Bayonne Bridge work. A "fast-track" review, begun in 2009, has led to 5,000 pages of environmental reports.


    That was back in 2009. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey first spent more than six months importuning various federal offices to serve as the lead agency for an environmental review. The law is vague about which agency is responsible. The Coast Guard finally agreed.

    Since then, the Port Authority’s “fast-track” approach to a project that will not alter the bridge’s footprint has generated more than 5,000 pages of federally mandated archaeological, traffic, fish habitat, soil, pollution and economic reports that have cost over $2 million. A historical survey of every building within two miles of each end of the bridge alone cost $600,000 — even though none would be affected by the project.

    After four years of work, the environmental assessment was issued in May and took into consideration comments from 307 organizations or individuals. The report invoked 207 acronyms, including M.B.T.A. (Migratory Bird Treaty Act) and N.L.R. (No Longer Regulated). Fifty-five federal, state and local agencies were consulted and 47 permits were required from 19 of them. Fifty Indian tribes from as far away as Oklahoma were invited to weigh in on whether the project impinged on native ground that touches the steel-arch bridge’s foundation.

    Maybe it would have been easier to lower the water than to raise the bridge. (In fact, the channel had already been dredged by the Army Corps of Engineers in anticipation of the Panama Canal project.)

    The approval process for the Bayonne Bridge reconstruction has become a case study, critics say, in the bureaucratic roadblocks imposed by decades-old federal environmental regulations.

    “Environmental review has evolved into an academic exercise like a game of who can find the most complications,” said Philip K. Howard, a lawyer who cites the Bayonne Bridge in his forthcoming book, “The Rule of Nobody: Saving America from Dead Laws and Broken Government.” “The Balkanization of authority among different agencies and levels of government creates a dynamic of buck-passing.”

    Those complications are a particular concern among local officials in the Northeast, where a public works program is often intended both to help an ailing economy and to salvage aging bridges and highways, since most projects are likely to be replacements (brand-new ones would require even more rigorous environmental reviews). The sweeping final environmental impact statement that was required before the Port Authority could begin replacing the nearby Goethals Bridge took almost 10 years to complete.

    The only reason a federal review was required at all for the Bayonne project was that the bridge spans a navigable waterway — even though raising the deck to 215 feet from about 151 feet above the waterline of Kill Van Kull, the tidal strait that separates Staten Island from Bayonne, N.J., will facilitate navigation rather than impede it.

    “We’re not proposing to build a nuclear plant on a pristine mountain lake,” said Patrick J. Foye, the executive director of the Port Authority. “We’re not building a bridge, we’re not knocking a bridge down, we don’t think there’ll be any increase in vehicular traffic. The environmental impact is more energy-efficient ships. They will emit less schmutz per container and per pair of Nikes.”

    Even as construction began in June, environmental groups and civic groups challenged the review process in a federal lawsuit. They argued that bigger containers being unloaded in Port Newark and Port Elizabeth would result in more truck traffic through Newark and other poor neighborhoods already polluted with diesel fumes and saddled with congested streets.
    “It assumes a more efficient port will cause people to buy more sneakers and iPads,” Mr. Foye said dismissively. The case is still pending.

    “The environmental process for public infrastructure is too long, costly and uncertain,” he said. “Public infrastructure ought to be treated differently, especially replacement of public infrastructure. And there ought to be someone in the process on the federal side who is looking at the impact of economic development and job retention.”

    As it is, the project manager, Joann Papageorgis, said the existing deck would be removed in two years after the locks of the Panama Canal have been widened to 180 feet from 110 feet and lengthened to 1,400 feet from 1,050 feet. That means ships carrying as many as 12,000 containers will pass under the Bayonne Bridge — the maximum today is 9,000 containers. A new roadway for the bridge is to be completed by mid-2017; the current bridge will be partly closed.

    The cost is estimated at $1.3 billion. The cost of a new bridge or a tunnel would have been about $4 billion. The new bridge will have wider lanes, bicycle and pedestrian pathways and the capacity to add public transit.

    The entire project, from conception to completion, is expected to take less than a decade — with the environmental review accounting for nearly half that time. As cumbersome as it was, the process was expedited by a presidential directive to speed construction of the Bayonne Bridge and six other public works projects across the country.

    And despite the protracted environmental review period, Ms. Papageorgis said the project was being done at warp speed when compared with other public works projects. (Consider, for example, the Second Avenue subway line in Manhattan.)

    “In my 40 years, this is the fastest I’ve ever seen an environmental assessment get done,” Ms. Papageorgis said. “We’re being criticized for rushing it.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/03/ny...iled.html?_r=0

  11. #86
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Exclamation This is Going To Be Messy

    Port Authority offering free hotel stays to Bayonne residents near noisy bridge construction

    By Felix Alarcon/The Jersey Journal
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    on February 10, 2014 at 9:45 AM, updated February 10, 2014 at 9:46 AM


    THE BAYONNE BRIDGE construction project might be causing too much noise for some residents. (JOURNAL FILE PHOTO)

    Tell you what, we’ll put you up at the Holiday Inn!

    That’s the latest offer Port Authority officials have made to Bayonne residents who have been complaining about noise and debris since the multi-billion Bayonne Bridge project kicked off five months ago.

    Joann Papageorgis, program director of the Bayonne Bridge Navigational Clearance Program at the Port Authority, confirmed to The Jersey Journal during a Feb. 3 phone interview that the bistate agency will pay for short stays in a hotel for residents on Avenue A and Kennedy Boulevard near the bridge if construction noise becomes too severe.

    Residents who live adjacent to the bridge will receive a packet in the mail by the end of the month outlining the hotel voucher program as well as an initiative to pay for new double-paned windows for some homeowners, Papageorgis said.

    She believes residents will not need to be relocated for more than a couple days to a week at any given time, essentially during the period that construction is taking place outside their window. The agency would be willing to put residents up in hotels in Jersey City, Newark, Essex County or Union County, she said.

    The bridge-raising project, which will take four years to complete, will make sure the larger cargo ships currently in use will be able to pass under the bridge en route to ports in Newark and Elizabeth, officials have said. The effort is one of the largest infrastructure projects taking place in the nation.

    The short-term program entails noise control officers, real-time monitoring and mitigation of noise levels in the area, Papageorgis said.

    The city noise code deems any sound louder than 85 decibels unacceptable. Port Authority spokesman Chris Valens said when construction exceeds that level, construction is halted.

    The PA has hired an independent company to monitor the noise level, Papageorgis added.

    Construction was halted in January, she said, when a construction vehicle struck an underground boulder.

    “There’s no way you can know in advance until you dig,” said Papageorgis. “If we hit a loud rock, we stop. We’ll try to go around the boulder.In some locations, when there are too many boulders to dig around, we will set up noise blankets."

    Tracey Fiuza, a resident of Kennedy Boulevard near First Street, said she isn’t keen about moving her family into a hotel room, even for a short period of time.

    “I told (PA official Bill) Young, you’re displacing me and putting me out of town and now I have to pay for gas and tolls to bring my daughter to school?” said Fiuza. “My daughter has practice, what about food? We won’t be able to cook. The PA will only pay for hotel and parking and that’s baloney.”

    Avenue A resident Lucia Frazier told The Jersey Journal that on Jan. 27 her home began to shake because of drilling for the project.

    “It’s pretty rough down here. Our quality of life isn’t good here," she said.

    “They start at 5:30 a.m. with the construction trucks, and the smell of the fumes and dirt they kick back,” said Dawn Levalle, a resident of Juliette Street. “I don’t think the worst has come yet.”

    http://www.nj.com/jjournal-news/inde...l#incart_river

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