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Thread: Victorian Flatbush

  1. #16
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    DITMAS PARK VICTORIAN

    $1,249,000

    BROOKLYN: 439 East 19th Street

    A five-bedroom three-and-a-half-bath frame house with a back porch, a second-floor balcony, four fireplaces, a finished basement, and a separate two-story garage with water and electricity.

    http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/200...ideshow_6.html

  2. #17

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    Crisp, inside and out.

    Like finding a 57 Chevy in original mint condition.

  3. #18
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    The woodwork inside is killer. Those built-in leaded glass bookcases are just like the ones in my sister's house, which also has sliding pocket doors of leaded glass between the main rooms. Man, they knew how to build 'em in those days.

  4. #19
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    Victorian Flatbush bashes brownstone bias in Landmarks Preservation Commission

    BY Mike Mclaughlin

    Where's the love?

    Victorian Flatbush residents feel snubbed by the city Landmarks Preservation Commission, which is expanding historic districts in brownstone neighborhoods - but has put their section of the borough on a back burner.

    "We're competing with other neighborhoods," said Ditmas Park West Neighborhood Association president Joel Siegel. "The [LPC] has limited resources, but it shouldn't be to the exclusion of the Victorian neighborhoods. If it's worthy, they should fund it and do it."

    The LPC quietly revealed in a January letter to a preservationist group that it would delay granting landmark status for the tree-lined, semisuburban blocks of Beverly Square West and Ditmas Park West.

    Instead, the LPC will press ahead with enlarging historic districts - which preserve neighborhood architecture - in Park Slope and near the Brooklyn Academy of Music.

    That sounded like a brownstone bias to Borough President Marty Markowitz, who blasted the LPC in a letter sent last week.

    "It is not appropriate public policy to place [Victorian Flatbush] on hold while purely Brownstone Brooklyn is pursued. There must be an equitable balance," Markowitz's letter said.

    Officials from the LPC said their decision made sense, because many buildings in the two Victorian neighborhoods have already been altered from their original design.

    They also denied that they play favorites, because two other Victorian Flatbush nooks were granted historic status in 2008.

    Park Slope residents supported the LPC and insisted their neighborhood needs another layer of protection against new development.

    "We don't need a lot of new development. I live in a building from the 1880s and I'm drawn to these older buildings," said Dennis Bodden, 32, a lawyer.

    Still, he was sympathetic to the snubbed Flatbush enclaves. "I feel bad, but you can't do it all at once," said Bodden.

    But in Victorian Flatbush, residents say that they have been waiting long enough for the city to answer their request.

    Siegel's group applied for historic status in 2005 and the Beverley Square West Neighborhood Association submitted its batch of documents in 2007.

    "It's a shame if they don't do it. This neighborhood deserves it," said Albert Bonadonna, 84, of Beverley Square West. "A lot of us would like to see it as a landmark."


  5. #20
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    Building of the Day: 2120-2126 Albemarle Terrace



    Address: 2120-2126 Albemarle Terrace, near Church Ave.
    Name: Private Houses
    Neighborhood: Flatbush (Albemarle-Kenmore Historic District)
    Year Built: 1916-17
    Architectural Style: Neo-Georgian
    Architect: Slee & Bryson
    Landmarked: Yes (Albermarle-Kenmore HD, 1978)

    Why chosen: These houses are located in one of the oldest parts of Flatbush, and are set back away from the hustle and bustle of Flatbush and Church Avenues. They are such an isolated enclave, and look so Early American, one might think they were the oldest houses in the area, but they are actually newer than most of Victorian Flatbush's large homes, and contemporaries of many of the nearby apartment buildings. The houses were built by Slee & Bryson, masters of Georgian-style suburban architecture, and are very similar to their houses built about the same time in nearby Lefferts Manor. They sit on a cul-de-sac with similar houses on both sides of the street capped off by taller and larger houses on each end. Kenmore St, another part of the historic district, but with a different architectural style, lies right behind. The streets maintain their isolation even more with with a private alley joining the back yards. The entire Albermarle-Kenmore enclaves were built for developer Mabel Bull, who sounds like a formidable woman. They were built to attract the middle class, and are quite cosy inside. Interestingly enough, many of the houses were built with Craftsman style interiors, which were quite popular at this time. Today, the houses still are very desirable for the same reasons they were when they were built – they evoke the classic ideal of the perfect American family home.


    Backyards


    Alleyway joining backyards.

    http://www.brownstoner.com/brownston...of_the_184.php

  6. #21

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    I love this area. Almost moved here when we were looking for a house, but I didn't have the guts.

  7. #22

  8. #23
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    Building of the Day: 131 Buckingham Road



    Address: 131 Buckingham Road, between Church Ave and Albemarle Rd.
    Name: Frederick and Loretto Kolle House, aka “the Japanese House”
    Neighborhood: Prospect Park South
    Year Built: 1902-1903
    Architectural Style: Japanese ornamented Queen Anne
    Architects: Petit and Greene
    Landmarked: Yes, Prospect Park South Historic District (1979)

    Why chosen: In 1899, developer Dean Alvord purchased 50 acres of Flatbush land for residential development. Prospect Park South was designed to be a high class suburban enclave, a “rural park” for the rich. He re-named the numbered streets with English sounding names, like Albemarle, Buckingham and Marlborough, laid out park malls, planted lots of trees and put up brick gateposts at the entrance to PPS. There were restrictions and rules regarding the prices, sizes and setbacks of homes, and buyers could use his architects, or bring in their own.

    Alvord’s main architect was John J. Petit, of Kirby, Petit & Green. They may be best known for their designs for the buildings of Dreamland, the huge amusement park in Coney Island, although they also had other impressive buildings in their portfolio. Petit and Alvord had worked together before, and PPS would be Petit’s greatest legacy. Along with architects Carroll Pratt and Slee & Bryson and others, Petit designed PPS over a period of years, in a potpourri of building styles, mixing Colonial Revival, Craftsman, Queen Anne, Tudor Revival, Spanish Mission, Italian Villas, a Swiss Chalet, and this “Japanese” house, probably the most photographed and famous house in Victorian Flatbush. Petit built this house on spec for Alvord, with no specific buyer in mind. He researched Japanese architecture, and was aided by three Japanese artisan/builders who oversaw the building, interior and garden. The house ended up costing more than any other house in the development, and Alvord wanted to play up the novelty and the uniqueness of the house as an advertising tool. It was a successful campaign.

    The house is a large stucco covered box with Japanese brackets, bargeboards and an upturned roof. Chrysanthemums decorate the façade, and today the house is quite striking in the colors chosen to highlight the Japanese details, although period postcards show a more subdued use of color. The interior carried the Japanese theme further, with hand painted Japanese designs and carvings on the fireplaces and ceilings. The dining room had leaded glass windows with a dragon design. The first owner of the house was Dr. Frederick Kolle, a prominent radiologist and plastic surgeon, and his wife Loretto, a motion picture script writer and novelist. The house has been faithfully cared for over 100 years, and is still one of the most striking and beautiful houses in an area of very impressive houses.




    Postcard from 1913.

    http://www.brownstoner.com/brownston...of_the_216.php

  9. #24
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    Building of the Day: 143 Buckingham Road



    Address: 143 Buckingham Road, corner of Albemarle Rd.
    Name: William and Lulu Norwood House
    Neighborhood: Prospect Park South
    Year Built: 1906
    Architectural Style: Northern Italian Villa with Colonial Revival bones
    Architect: Walter S. Cassin
    Landmarked: Yes, part of the Prospect Park South HD, designated in 1979.

    Why chosen: The historic district report for PPS calls this house “one of the most impressive houses in the district.” Apparently, it is also one of the few single family homes in the area to be entirely constructed of brick. And construct it, they did. At 49 x33 feet, with almost 5,000 square feet of house, this is some home. The eye is first drawn to that magnificent tower, with recessed loggia, peaked roof and jaunty finial. How great would it be to have that outside your bedroom window?

    The strong Mediterranean feel of the house is due in the most part to the bracketed porch, tower, hipped roof and deep bracketed eaves which surround the house.

    Underneath all of that is really a very large Colonial Revival house, with classic details such as splayed stone lintels, dormers, and a Palladian-like window on a second story bay. It is said that Dean Alvord, who developed Prospect Park South, had a special regard for Buckingham Road, the shortest road in his development. All of the houses are unique, some are architectural masterpieces, and this one would have been visible from his own mansion, just across the way, on Albemarle. The house was built for successful real estate broker William Norwood, and his wife Lulu.

    Inside, the house boasts an impressive living room, dining room, kitchen, billiard room, music room, eight bedrooms, and three bathrooms. Walter Cassin seems to be an unknown, I was not able to find any information on him, although there were a number of Cassins who were involved with architecture, but I don’t know if they were relatives. If this was his only major house, he certainly did himself proud, designing an impressive, yet attractive house in a wealthy suburban neighborhood of impressive houses.


    (Photo: Andrew Dolkart for LPC Designation Report, 1979)


    (Photo: donwiss.com. Date unknown)

    http://www.brownstoner.com/brownston...of_the_233.php

  10. #25
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    WTF is going on with the entrance to that house in the middle .


    Closing Bell: East Flatbush House Tour


    The second annual house tour for an area in Flatbush called Clarendon Meadows—bounded by New York Avenue on the east, Bedford Avenue on the west, Cortelyou Road on the north, and Foster Avenue on the south—will take place this Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. The tour is organized by the Clarendon Meadows Association, which resident and broker Marie Campbell has set up, in part, "to protect, highlight, preserve and showcase the various Victorians, limestone and brownstone homes in the neighborhood."

    The tour is free, and registration starts at 12:30 at the Eureka Educational Center on the corner of Clarendon Road and East 25th Street.

    http://www.brownstoner.com/brownston..._bell_ea_3.php

  11. #26
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    WTF is going on with the entrance to that house in the middle
    Wow! that's hideous.

  12. #27

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    I don't think those Victorians are representative of the majority of the neighborhood. There are survivors here and there, but most of the pre-war houses are very nice brick row houses.

    And there isn't one theme to warrant a name like Clarendon Meadows.

    I'd be really mad if I lived in #1 or #3.

    That green metal awning should be replaced with fabric.

  13. #28
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    (I hate IE9 )


    Building of the Day: 155 Argyle Road



    Name: Private house
    Address: 155 Argyle Road, between Albemarle and Beverley Roads
    Neighborhood: Prospect Park South
    Year Built: 1906
    Architectural Style: Shingle Style
    Architect: George E. Showers
    Other buildings by architect: 86 and 150 Argyle Road, 180 Marlborough Road, all PPS
    Landmarked: Yes, part of PPS HD (1979)

    The story: The Shingle Style of architecture is as
    American as apple pie. Inspired by the shingle clad homes of New
    England, built in the 18th century, the Shingle Style evolved into the
    favored architecture of the well-to-do of the late 19th and early 20th
    century. We can blame Charles Follen McKim for this, the equally
    talented, but often unappreciated partner of the much flashier Stanford
    White. (Mr. Mead was the business end of the firm of MM &W) His
    studies of Colonial-era buildings while working at the NYC offices of
    Henry Hobson Richardson would lead to his famous partnership, and also
    to a new style of building.

    This all started in the 1870’s, and coincided with the 1876 celebration
    of the nation’s centennial. Nostalgic looks at all things Colonial led
    many in the architectural field to start to extrapolate ideas from the
    nation’s first houses, mix them with a contemporary English influence,
    add some individual imagination, mix it all with the materials and
    nuances of the popular Queen Anne Victorian styles and make it truly
    unique. The best place to experiment with such ideas is always with the
    rich. American industrialists, financiers, and businessmen were making
    money hand over fist, and had no problem spending their money on large
    homes, especially in posh resort communities like Newport, RI. Firms
    like McKim, Mead & White, Henry Hobson Richardson, John Calvin
    Stevenson, and others, built magnificent summer “cottages” throughout
    New England, all clad in shingles, all embodying the style’s signature
    homey, cozy comfortableness. (Amazing, considering most of these houses
    were ginormous.)

    Fast forward to this house. By the time Dean Alvord was developing
    Prospect Park South in 1899, the Shingle Style was now a popular staple
    of suburban and small town architecture. It had been successfully used
    in Tuxedo Park, NY, one of the inspirations for PPS. All sorts of
    architects had shrunk and simplified the über elements of the Newport
    “cottages” into the upper middle class comforts of a large, but not
    overly ostentatious, style of home. These homes were based on a Queen
    Anne style aesthetic, with large porches, towers and turrets, lots of
    unevenly spaced windows of various sizes, varied rooflines, dormers and
    bays, all covered in wooden shingles.

    This home was designed by George E. Showers in 1906, for John
    Thompson, a Brooklyn realtor. Although lovingly restored now, by its
    current owners, to its original shingled glory, it was covered in
    aluminum siding when the district was designated in 1979, which obscured
    most of its charms. It has a classic New England gambrel roofed body in
    front, and the house is actually two gambrel shapes intersecting in the
    middle. Today, it’s back to what it should be, even though the second
    floor terrace and the enclosed casement porch are later alterations. The
    curved casement windows in the porch add interest to the house,
    highlight the turret, and look great. The weathered gray shingles and
    soft green accents are highly complementary, and the house has great
    curb appeal. This is a fine example of the Shingle Style, and a
    beautiful house. GMAP





    http://www.brownstoner.com/blog/2011...d/?stream=true

  14. #29
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    Building of the Day: 1440 Albemarle Road



    Name: Private House
    Address: 1440 Albemarle Road
    Cross Streets: corner of Marlborough Road
    Neighborhood: Prospect Park South
    Year Built: 1905
    Architectural Style: Colonial Revival
    Architect: Robert Bryson and Carroll Pratt
    Other works by architect: Bryson (Slee & Bryson) Albemarle-Kenmore Terrace houses, Flatbush, other houses in PPS, PS, CHN, CHS, and PLG. Carroll Pratt – various houses in PPS.
    Landmarked: Yes, part of Prospect Park South HD (1979)

    The story: You can’t walk or drive through Prospect Park South without seeing this house. It’s on Albemarle Road, the main street and showcase block of the neighborhood, and it’s a huge behemoth in a neighborhood of large houses, sitting on a prime corner lot. The style of the house is called Colonial Revival, and it’s a catch-all of early American styles: English Georgian, Federal, Greek Revival, with a healthy dash of extra Classical and Victorian elements, in this case, all on some heavy architectural steroids. This was a home built to impress, and it does so quite well.

    The house was built for J.C. Woodhull, a prominent Brooklyn lumber dealer, which kind of figures, as they sure used a lot of lumber to build this massive 48×60 three story house. At the time in 1905, one of the architects, Carroll Pratt, was the chief architect of the development, a job he took over from the original chief architect, John J. Petit. He teamed up with Robert Bryson, who would soon partner with John Slee to create some of Brooklyn’s best brick Colonial Revival houses in Lefferts Manor and other neighborhoods. Slee & Bryson met here, working on Prospect Park South. These two men designed a house large enough to include every element of Colonial Revival style imaginable.

    You’ve got Palladian windows, enormous fluted columns topped with Ionic capitals, Doric pilasters under the porch, and Corinthian capitals and columns in the grand entryway. That’s a chapter on Classical architecture right there. The large house swells with bows, bays, oriels, balustrades and porches, and even has a conservatory in the back, as well as another balcony and porch. Chimneys abound, and there are windows of every size and shape, lots of them. And of course, there is a garage of a later date, but even it has columns.

    Sadly, what keeps this house from being lauded as one of PPS’ greatest, is the loss of the original clapboard siding. The entire house, even at the time of its designation in the PPS Historic District in 1979, was covered in a grey/green asphalt shingles. The shingles were put on very carefully, and well, so the house is very trim and neat looking, and it is impeccably cared for. What a wonderful massive Victorian steamboat of a house it would be if it could someday get its original cladding restored, in what would be a very expensive undertaking. In any case, and by any definition, this is still some house.




    Photo: Kate Leonova for Property Shark,


    Photo: InsertSnappyNameHere, on Flickr

    http://www.brownstoner.com/blog/2011...d/?stream=true

  15. #30
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    Not Victorian but nonetheless also magnifiques.


    Building of the Day: 17-33 Linden Boulevard




    Name: Row houses
    Address: 17-33 Linden Boulevard
    Cross Streets: Flatbush and Bedford Avenues
    Neighborhood: Flatbush
    Year Built: 1899-1900
    Architectural Style: French Renaissance Revival
    Architect: F.L. Lowe
    Other buildings by architect: Standish Arms Hotel/Apts, Brooklyn Heights
    Landmarked: No

    The story: In 1899, a Chicago architect/builder/developer named Clarence H. Tabor came to NY, looking for new opportunities. Tabor was a successful architect/developer in the Chicago area, known for his suburban homes. He told the Brooklyn Eagle that in his opinion, after travelling throughout the country, that the Greater New York area had the most attractive suburbs of any city in America, and that Brooklyn was his best choice among boroughs, and Flatbush was the best choice in Brooklyn. He intended to live there, and begin his development business. At that time, Flatbush was fast becoming a middle and upper-class suburban community, with large suburban homes going up everywhere, as well as rows of excellent townhouses, and better apartment buildings.

    Tabor quickly bought a large plot of land starting at Flatbush and Linden Blvd, and stretching 300’ down Linden. His plan was to build nine row houses and three apartment buildings, of which two now survive. He hired Brooklyn architect F. L. Lowe, who had a successful, though low-key career, with buildings like the now Standish Arms Apartments, on Columbia Heights, in Brooklyn Heights, to his name. Lowe designed the houses and the apartment buildings in a limestone and red brick French Renaissance Revival style, which the Brooklyn Eagle said was in the “Philadelphia and Chicago styles”.

    According to the paper, the “Philadelphia” part was the exterior and interior appearances, while “Chicago” referred to their contiguous row appearance on the street. The paper also noted that the houses did not have basements, in what we now call English basement style houses. The interior of the row houses was as follows: “Upon entrance, the visitor is ushered into a wide hall, to the right of which is the parlor, with a large foyer in its rear extending from the other as an L. In this foyer is an elaborate mantle over an open grate fireplace. Behind the foyer is the dining room separated by the butler’s pantry from the kitchen, which is in a rear extension. On the second floor are three large bedrooms with dressers built in with hot and cold water, while the third floor contains three other rooms with a bath.”

    The sales of the houses proceeded well, and in 1902, Tabor traded two of the apartment buildings for a property on Flatbush and Hawthorne, where he planned to build a fine, and expensive residential hotel. If he did do that, it’s no longer there. He did go on to build other suburban type single family houses in what is now called Victorian Flatbush.

    Tabor and his wife appear in the Eagle’s society and events pages, and he got himself involved in local politics. In 1899, he also published a book called Tabor’s Modern Homes, which was a pattern book of designs of suburban homes, and other buildings. Clients could order the plans for his buildings, and receive blueprints and suggestions for interior finishings, etc. One of his houses, built from plan #2 in his book, is now called the Charles N. Loucks House, and is a Queen Anne suburban style house, located in Chicago. It was landmarked in 2008.

    It’s interesting that these houses and the apartment buildings are nothing like Tabor’s own architectural work, as he seems to have left Mr. Lowe to his own designs, and was only interested in them as investments. Today, these houses still survive, and although altered, painted and otherwise “modernized” in several ways, still catch the attention of passersby. I’ve had several people ask me about them, and I’m happy to have found out something of their story.






    One of the adjoining apartment buildings built at the same time as the houses.

    http://www.brownstoner.com/blog/2012...d/?stream=true

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