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Thread: Forbes Most Expensive Zip Codes

  1. #1

    Default Forbes Most Expensive Zip Codes

    #13: 10013 (tribeca)
    #42 10012 (soho)

    http://www.forbes.com/lifestyle/2005...l?boxes=custom

  2. #2

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    Park Row? Fulton? They don't seem to belong.

  3. #3
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    #45 10069 (?)

    Thats my zip code. Well I live on 70th and Riverside Boulevard. You know the Trump towers.

  4. #4

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    Just 30 years ago Soho and Tribeca were run-down and spooky. Who would ever want to live in those filthy buildings or visit those empty streets?

    And yet today, with comparitively little new building, landmark protection and strict zoning laws, these out-of-the way former dumps are now among the priciest places to live in all of the USA....

    Whatīs the lesson here?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio
    Just 30 years ago Soho and Tribeca were run-down and spooky. Who would ever want to live in those filthy buildings or visit those empty streets?

    And yet today, with comparitively little new building, landmark protection and strict zoning laws, these out-of-the way former dumps are now among the priciest places to live in all of the USA....

    Whatīs the lesson here?
    I think the lesson is stop tearing down NYC's history. The high quality of architecture in both neighborhoods - combined with relatively low density - is what has made the real estate so expensive and driven development. Over time, people choose quality over quantity.

  6. #6
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio
    Just 30 years ago Soho and Tribeca were run-down and spooky. Who would ever want to live in those filthy buildings or visit those empty streets?
    I've lived in the heart of SoHo for 25 + years and there are many days when I long for "empty streets" rather than the hordes of shoppers, gawkers, cell-phone staring widewalk-blockers that fill the area now.

    Sure you had to walk 8 blocks to the food market, but that was small price to pay for quiet + solitude.

    Now you can't find a parking space to save your life. I don't have a car so it's no big problem for me -- other than the incessant honking because people park where it is not allowed which jams up the streets. A left turn from Broadway onto Spring can take what seems like days (often due to all the limos illegally parked outside of Balthazar -- which, aside from terrific food and ambience, has to be one of the most stuck-up joints in town).

    Plus who are all these certified artists (this is a zoning requirement for residential habitation in SoHo -- like it or not, it's the law even though it is never enforced) that can afford $1,000,000 - $5,000,000 to buy the luxury housing that continues to be built here? But maybe it's OK to flout the law as long as it increases the tax base for the city.

    I'm not against change (I've changed a lot over the past quarter century!!), but these are just a few examples of how something that seems great to one person can be seen as entirely different to another.

  7. #7

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    Lofter: I couldnīt agree with you more. But the point of my post was how landmarking and zoning can help to increase the "desirablitiy" of a neighborhood. There are often so many anti-nimby sentiments posted on these forums.... but soho and tribeca are examples of how protectionism can revive a "run-down" area.

    The first time I visited Soho was as a teen in 1972. A teacher friend of mine took me along to see an artist friend of hers who was living in a loft. When I moved to manhattan in the mid 70īs, Iīd go down often to see gallery shows. The soho of today has little in common with the soho I once knew. Today it has almost nothing to do with art, and the atmosphere is completely gone. I agree with your comments ....but I hope you understand the context of my post.

  8. #8

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    #130? Brooklyn Heights? Brooklyn Heights is VERY expensive, i don't know why it's only 130. All the people in this neighborhood are so rich...investment bankers, lawers, stoke brokers, CEO's, everything.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1
    I've lived in the heart of SoHo for 25 + years and there are many days when I long for "empty streets" rather than the hordes of shoppers, gawkers, cell-phone staring widewalk-blockers that fill the area now.

    Sure you had to walk 8 blocks to the food market, but that was small price to pay for quiet + solitude.

    Now you can't find a parking space to save your life. I don't have a car so it's no big problem for me -- other than the incessant honking because people park where it is not allowed which jams up the streets. A left turn from Broadway onto Spring can take what seems like days (often due to all the limos illegally parked outside of Balthazar -- which, aside from terrific food and ambience, has to be one of the most stuck-up joints in town).

    Plus who are all these certified artists (this is a zoning requirement for residential habitation in SoHo -- like it or not, it's the law even though it is never enforced) that can afford $1,000,000 - $5,000,000 to buy the luxury housing that continues to be built here? But maybe it's OK to flout the law as long as it increases the tax base for the city.

    I'm not against change (I've changed a lot over the past quarter century!!), but these are just a few examples of how something that seems great to one person can be seen as entirely different to another.

    It seems to me that you would be more at home somewhere in the suburbs. What you long for is a dream...1 grocery store in 8 blocks? Solitude and ubiquotous silence...in manhattan? Right now the real estate market is booming (for how long it will last is arguable) and developements are rampid as we all can see. So inevitably change will happen...with a hot market, people move in and a few move out, thus a lager population and "peace and silence" goes out the doors. Times are changing and cities grow, if you don't like that people are populating them and acting like the dicks that they are, the out most reaches of the outer boroughs or the suburbs are a nice alternative

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio
    Lofter: I couldnīt agree with you more. But the point of my post was how landmarking and zoning can help to increase the "desirablitiy" of a neighborhood. There are often so many anti-nimby sentiments posted on these forums.... but soho and tribeca are examples of how protectionism can revive a "run-down" area.

    The first time I visited Soho was as a teen in 1972. A teacher friend of mine took me along to see an artist friend of hers who was living in a loft. When I moved to manhattan in the mid 70īs, Iīd go down often to see gallery shows. The soho of today has little in common with the soho I once knew. Today it has almost nothing to do with art, and the atmosphere is completely gone. I agree with your comments ....but I hope you understand the context of my post.

    But your agrument against building goes against your feelings on gentrfacation.


    If you build, then that lowers prices and demand. If you don't, then pretty soon, NYC will be nothing but a giant, whtie, rich Westchester.


    You see, building is your friend, not your enemy.

  11. #11

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    "If you build, then that lowers prices and demand".

    I donīt believe that. And ruining the architectural integrity of Soho would not have been the answer.

    Those buildings will remain, and the make up of the neighborhood will change with the times.

    BTW: I live in a building that is about 750 years old ...give or take a few decades. My life there, is just a speck in itīs history. So who knows what the future will hold for Soho (or Manhattan) decades (or centuries) from now. In the meantime, Iīm glad to see those buildings saved.

  12. #12

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    Nobody is saying that's a bad thing. I LOVE SoHo! I would be mighty pissed to see them take down those cast-iron buildings. You might see me go NIMBY!


    However, there has to be limits. The Fordham University expansion is a good example. People simply don't want to share. Too bad.

    As for your beilef in free-market capitalism, may I remind you that the Soviet Union is no more for a reason. Capitalism is the best way to fullfill the needs of the people. More housing feeds demand. Period.

    Old does not equal good all the time. There must be something special about it. SoHo=Mega special. 2 CC=not really (IMO).

  13. #13

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    "As for your beilef in free-market capitalism, may I remind you that the Soviet Union is no more for a reason. Capitalism is the best way to fullfill the needs of the people. More housing feeds demand. Period".

    I certainly do believe in capitalism... but "free-market", unbridled, wild-west capitalism? No.

  14. #14

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    And BTW ( sorry for the double post):

    "Old does not equal good all the time. There must be something special about it. SoHo=Mega special."

    "Soho equals Mega special" for you ....now that it has been restored, given new uses and made contemporary. Easy to say that now.

    When was the first time you vistited it?

    Imagine that it is 1965, back when when the word "NEW" equaled "mega special". Your feelings would have been different. Soho back then was a decaying area whose buildings made no sense.

    Thank God for the crazy artists, bohemians and preservationist egg-heads who (as usual) had foresight.

  15. #15

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    Right. Those same egg-heads would have said the South Bronx in 1975 was funky.

    It wasn't funky. It was a hellhole for everyone who lived there. Period.

    Thank god for low-income housing with foresight. Now, it is a thriving working-class area with new housing all over.

    If it was up to you guys, you would have stopped any new construction and told everyone to clear out. You seem like you'd stop every single building from going up.

    Not every 'hood is SoHo. You see, I live in the real world. Where people need places to live and jobs to go to. Maybe you should visit.

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