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Thread: 25 Bond - NoHo - Condo - by BKSK Architects

  1. #1
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Default 25 Bond - NoHo - Condo - by BKSK Architects

    25 Bond Unveiled

    curbed
    March 19, 2007
    by ROK88



    After months of hiding behind a big white shroud the new residential condo at
    25 Bond in NoHo dropped its cover this past weekend. And what a handsome
    face it has. Eight stories of hefty rough-cut Jerusalem limestone partnered
    with details of dark bronzed steel. It's been designed by architect George Schieferdecker
    of BKSK Architects as six stories of four bold asymmetrically arranged sections
    with recessed windows down below and a couple of stories of contrasting steel crowning
    the top. The building runs for a full 100 feet along Bond Street across from
    Ian Schrager / Herzog and de Meuron's all glass palace at 40 Bond.
    What a pair these two make. As different as Archy and Mehitabel.


    [The shrouded 25 Bond as seen from Bond (left) and from Bleecker up Shinbone Alley]


    [The Bond Street facade (left) and the rear facade looking out over Shinbone Alley]

    The owner of this nugget of downtown gold is Shinbone Alley Associates,
    but anyone with a yen to buy here shouldn't even bother making a phone call.
    Word is that everything is pre-sold. And while DOB says that there will be 23 units inside,
    the creative team got an OK to cut that down to 14 cozy abodes.

    Hmmm. Eight stories and 14 units. Doing the math we're imagining something
    taking up a full floor, big and spacious. At 8,000 square feet per floor that could
    make for some nice room to play, no? And what if there were a duplex or a triplex
    up top? Better yet. And did we mention all the fireplaces? Crikey! That'd make
    for a place as wide and warm as Australia.



    [The Jerusalem limestone from Palestine that BKSK Architects chose for the facade]


    [The glass of 40 Bond reflecting 25 Bond across the way]

    An added bonus: 25 Bond sits above the City's new Third Water Tunnel,
    which might come in handy if the Shinbone Alley partners ever want to add a
    pool to that pretty garden out back. And when they do then all the newbies
    living on what is becoming one of the more interesting blocks in town could
    get together and throw a roaming pool party. Could be fun.
    Would alley cats and cockroaches be welcomed?


    [NYC DEP Map showing the path of City Tunnel No. 3 as it runs below 25 Bond]

    157 Chambers Transforming into Artisan Lofts [Curbed]
    40 Bond Update #1: Sunglasses Time! [Curbed]
    40 Bond Update #2: View From the Top [Curbed]
    Tunnel No. 3 Update: NIMBY, Says East 50s [Curbed]
    Development Du Jour: 48 Bond [Curbed]
    Getting Your Toes Wet at 48 Bond [Curbed]

  2. #2

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    Looks urbane, sophisticated... but still, what a shame when architects insist on the asymmetrical in a sea of classical... as if simple symmetry is somehow not entertaining enough.

  3. #3
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    That looks very nice. This only happens when good creativity is implemented well. As oppose to just implement a glass wall. It work nice here. Can't wait to see what it looks like at street level and its glassier backside.

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    101 Warren's baby brother.

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    20 W 20's distant cousin. Very, very nice.

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    The Dude Abides
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio View Post
    Looks urbane, sophisticated... but still, what a shame when architects insist on the asymmetrical in a sea of classical... as if simple symmetry is somehow not entertaining enough.
    Honestly, I don't see the need to go "classical" here.

  7. #7

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    I don't see the need to go asymmetrical.

    Honestly? For me, it cheapens the design a bit.... perhaps because asymetrical window treatments are the rage. We can find quite a number built or being built. Ho-hums it.

    I love the way 40Bond is innovative and cool in a very original way.

    Be that as it may, as I said: 25 Bond looks sophisticated, urbane. Picking nits.

    ----
    Last edited by Fabrizio; March 19th, 2007 at 04:17 PM.

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    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    How refreshing to see a building that looks better than its rendering. Very high quality.

  9. #9

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    Better than Stern.

    Maybe better than Herzog and DeMeuron --with a lot less fuss.

    Who says you have to be overwrought to be interesting?

    This building's a sendup of all the overstyled, loud and oversculpted prima donnas like Westin, Conde Nast and (yes) Bank of America.

  10. #10

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    Interesting too that the building's vocabulary is very 50's-60's international style (with some pre-war avante guarde Europe thrown in.) Yet up-to-the-minute.

    Could be Geneva 1958. Get out the Citroen Pallas convertible.

    The more I'm looking at it, the more its my kinda building.

  11. #11
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    Very nice looking, for once a building thats better looking than its rendering.

  12. #12

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    Two thumbs up !


    ......and I think I recall that both buildings replaced ugly parking lots.


    If only the other developers in this town had such committment to quality. If they are reading this,,,,,spend the extra money for a talented architect and don't penny pinch on the building materials. This is your legacy - build something that you will be proud of and that people walking by will enjoy long after we are all gone.

  13. #13
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    A little birdie tells me that the fourth and fifth floors are each one full unit (~ 7,500 habitable sf). 5 bedrooms. His and Her separate baths in the Master Bedroom. Great Room looking onto Bond Street which measures ~100' x ~30'. The windows in that space are floor to ceiling and look out onto 40 Bond -- quite a site -- they fully open into the space a couple of inches and then pivet to the side. There are little mini-Juliet balconies all across (but you can't really step outside -- glass balustrades there) and are inset from the stone pillared facade. Those units have Four Fireplaces in each -- long and low. All very sleek and moderne.

    According to a comenter on curbed the number of units has been reduced again from 14 to 9. From what I've heard that makes sense:

    2 on #2, 2 on #3, 1 on #4, 1 on #5 and the 2 duplexes and the triplex = 9.

    Yowza!!!

    Word is that the floors above (6, 7, 8) include two duplexes and a triplex.

    One document I saw by searching nyc.gov website says that they got an OK for parking for 51 cars in the basement ... but not sure if that was changed when the number of units was amended.

    This is a great block -- and has very little through traffic, as it is one-way to the east (it becmes E. 2nd after The Bowery) and dead ends at Broadway.

    Now if DOT will just fix the Belgian Blocks on the road surface (it's one of the worst radways in downtown Manhattan and has been for years -- they re-did the block to the west a while back) this little block will be gorgeous.

  14. #14
    The Dude Abides
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio View Post
    I don't see the need to go asymmetrical.

    Honestly? For me, it cheapens the design a bit.... perhaps because asymetrical window treatments are the rage. We can find quite a number built or being built. Ho-hums it.

    I love the way 40Bond is innovative and cool in a very original way.

    Be that as it may, as I said: 25 Bond looks sophisticated, urbane. Picking nits.

    ----
    It doesn't look like there was a "need" to go asymmetrical. It looks whimsical and spontaneous as is, just the sort of thing that makes a block with plenty of traditional buildings more untraditional (read: interesting).

    If it truly cheapened the design for the reasons you mention, then one would have to question why any architectural treatment that was "all the rage" at a certain time period created many similar-looking buildings, be it Beaux-Arts, Deco, or International. Are all of those thereby "cheapened"? Don't think so.

    If anything, I think this building is indicative that the trend towards assymetrical window treatments is a beneficial one, in terms of design quality. Just look at 101 Warren: another residential condo using a lot of limestone. When's the last time we had two or more new buildings doing that?

  15. #15

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    "If it truly cheapened the design for the reasons you mention, then one would have to question why any architectural treatment that was "all the rage" at a certain time period created many similar-looking buildings, be it Beaux-Arts, Deco, or International."

    That's a good point point and something I pondered about while looking at the photos.

    ( and again I admit I'm nit-picking here.)

    But is it a long term "style" (as were B-A, Deco or International) or rather this years fins?

    You write: "If anything, I think this building is indicative that the trend towards assymetrical window treatments is a beneficial one, in terms of design quality. Just look at 101 Warren: another residential condo using a lot of limestone. When's the last time we had two or more new buildings doing that?"

    What do asymetrical window treatments have to do with the choice of limestone as a building material?

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