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Thread: 201 East 57th Street

  1. #1
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    Default 201 East 57th Street


    Just notice this building has been covered with the black demo netting.

    http://www.marxrealty.com/properties...7thstreet.html

  2. #2

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    What F...U...CKING crime. That really sucks. NY is f...ucked up. Where are all of the a_holes that fought the Torre Verre?

  3. #3
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    201 East 57th:

    aka 201-203 E 57th / 953-955 Third Avenue

    Block / Lot: 1331 / 1

    DOB Info

    Full Demo Approved 10.08.09

    New Building App (4 story commercial) Disapproved 7.29.09

    TPG ARCHITECTURE LLP

    Owner: JOSEPH E. MARX CO., INC.

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    That gorgeous brownstone facade of the upper floors ought to be forcibly grafted onto the base of The International:

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    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Word is that they're going to put up a glass box in its place, a four-story glass box no less. How retarded is that?

    But then again, that shouldn't be surprising since this is New York, where they're willing to do whatever it takes at any costs to fight something nice from going up on empty parking lot but won't even bat an eye to save something nice from getting destroyed senselessly.

  6. #6

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    I agree with you, Antinimby. This is BULLS...HIT.


  7. #7

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    Funny to think that in someone's head somewhere this project is a no-brainer. Silly humans!

  8. #8

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    These glass retail boxes seem to be popular in the area. These are both by Vornado's pet architect Brenan Beer Gorman


    968 Third Avenue


    715 Lexington

    Proof that nothing is safe from redevelopment, even if all of the development rights have been usurped.

  9. #9
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    New version of the NYC tax payer.

  10. #10
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    It's all to fulfill the tenants' desire for sleek, floor-to-ceiling windows and lots of light.

    Meanwhile the city is one step closer to tedious anonymity.

  11. #11

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    I think the average NYer feels these are an improvement.
    Once they lose their shine and get a little dirty, they'll look like crap. The biggest fault of modern architecture.

  12. #12
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    I walk past this almost everyday and it's been heartbreaking to see the whole process play out. Now, the black death shroud has been wrapped around the building. Goodbye.

    This was one of the oldest remaining buildings in the area...I think I remember reading it was from the mid 1800's, but I'm not sure the year.

    They could have opened up the interior spaces for retail, converting the already spoiled base into whatever glass trendiness they want...then dramatize the upper exterior and window detailing with attractive lighting. Instant class, and a great retail space too.

    What they're doing instead, it's a great loss. When I look upon the flimsy, cheapo glass box of 4 floors they're replacing it with... I'll want to vomit. What does this say about our society. This city is so twisted.

    I regret that I never photographed it well...it's too late now.

  13. #13
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    You can get lots of views of it and surroundings on Google Maps street view.


    While not well cared for, it was an island of old New York class in a sea of Sao Paulo-like dystopian UES architectural garbage.

  14. #14
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    The more things change, the more things stay the same. There are virtually countless soul-less 1970s/80s crap stone corner retail boxes throughout the city. The optimist in me rationalizes them as place holders.

    The upside to the glass boxes is that I can pressed ham them.

  15. #15
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    Well there is no upside to destroying a beautiful building from 1874.


    This article, from 2005:


    STREETSCAPES/57th Street and Third Avenue; Startling Survivor in an Area of Change


    THE rise of the One Beacon Court tower at 58th Street and Third Avenue, site of Bloomberg L.P.'s new headquarters and multimillion-dollar condos, has increased the real estate stakes in what was once an area of unassuming mid-19th-century buildings.


    One of those remaining -- the most ambitious -- is the 1874 bank and apartment house at 201 East 57th Street, which was built when Third Avenue was the East Side's dominant thoroughfare.


    The opening of the surface horse-car line up Third Avenue in the 1850's brought development along that spine much sooner than on its neighbors. The older Boston Post Road -- snaking up the East Side irregularly between Second and Third -- and the New York and Harlem Railroad, running up Park Avenue, served only to strengthen Third Avenue's position as the center of the East Side.


    Third Avenue was quickly built up with two-, three- and four-story tenements and small apartment houses, many of which still survive, and the intersection at 57th Street became important.


    In 1874, John Davidson, an East Side builder, put up a relatively large mixed-use structure at the northeast corner of 57th and Third, its five stories and double lot much bigger than its typically diminutive neighbors.
    Designed by Schulze & Schoen, the building, at 201 East 57th, contained apartments, with stores on the ground floor and what the building application described as ''lodge rooms'' on the top floor. The original street-level facade was of rich, bulky stonework -- perhaps granite -- with massive, stunted pilasters in the neo-Grec style.


    The upper walls were plain, but each window was surrounded by a blocky stone enframement, with unusual forms and incised detail. The cornice is composed of sharply modeled triangular forms and projecting ornaments. The structure was probably considered Renaissance at the time, but now presents a lugubrious Germanic character.


    The new 201 East 57th was more than just a simple real estate investment. Davidson was also the founding president of the Manufacturers' and Builders' Bank, organized in 1869, which took the corner store.


    Another commercial tenant was Fritz Handrich, who ran a restaurant and wine business there.


    The 1880 census taker found the 40-year-old Handrich living upstairs with his family of seven, two servants and two boarders -- a porter and a driver, who appear to have been his employees.


    The next year, The Times reported that his two servants -- Henrietta Braunsdorfer, 17, and Barbara Weiss, 19 -- had been found asphyxiated by leaking gas in what was apparently an accident. Braunsdorfer had partly roused herself and was found with her head on Weiss's chest.


    In the 1890's, the lodge rooms were occupied by the Maimonides Library, a Jewish lending library started in the early 1850's. In the era before the creation of city's public library system -- established in the 1890's -- privately owned lending and research libraries fulfilled a public purpose, and many were supported by the city.


    The upper floors of the building as it now stands show what has to be the original facade material, the characteristic oblong blocks of brownstone. But the earliest sharp photograph of the building, an 11-by-14-inch glass plate negative at the Museum of the City of New York, was made about 1900 and shows the upper floors as brick with bright white mortar, along with added balconies and an entranceway on Third Avenue.


    That image was made just after a major renovation, and the ''brick'' on the upper floors appears to have been an illusionistic paint job, perhaps intended to lighten or even ''colonialize'' what was by then an outdated Victorian leftover. Other instances of such faux painting are known, but the thinking and taste behind them are not well understood. To contemporary eyes, stone is a more desirable material than brick.


    Unlike picturesque Lexington Avenue, an architectural paradise of odd shops and brownstones, Third Avenue on the Upper East Side is a comparative desert to the pedestrian's eye, at least regarding older architecture. Bloomingdale's 1880's facade, from 59th to 60th, is nearly invisible under layers of paint, and is fairly routine anyway.
    ----

    The person responsible for the decision to destroy this building deserves to be destroyed themselves.
    On the google street view, despite its neglect, this is the best looking thing in sight.

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