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Thread: 1980s New York City

  1. #1
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Default 1980s New York City

    Ah, that siren at the beginning. It somehow sounded different back then...grittier. I do miss the bygone grittiness of New York City.



  2. #2
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    A 30-Year Time Lapse of the Lower East Side

    By COLIN MOYNIHAN


    Brian Rose and Edward Fausty
    Delancey and Orchard Streets, circa 1980.


    Brian Rose
    Delancey and Orchard Streets, circa 2010


    Brian Rose and Edward Fausty
    Tompkins Square Park in Alphabet City, circa 1980


    Brian Rose
    Tompkins Square Park in Alphabet City, circa 2010


    Brian Rose and Edward Fausty
    Ludlow Street, circa 1980


    Brian Rose
    Clinton Street and Rivington Street, circa 2010


    Brian Rose and Edward Fausty
    Delancey Street, looking south, circa 1980


    Brian Rose and Edward Fausty
    East 4th Street, circa 1980


    Brian Rose and Edward Fausty
    The Williamsburg Bridge, circa 1980


    Brian Rose
    The Williamsburg Bridge, circa 2010


    Brian Rose and Edward Fausty
    East Broadway, circa 1980


    Brian Rose and Edward Fausty
    East Fifth Street, circa 1980


    Brian Rose
    East Fifth Street, circa 2010.

    Toward the end of 1979, Brian Rose and Edward Fausty began roaming the Lower East Side of Manhattan with a Japanese view camera attached to a tripod. New York City’s fiscal crisis was a fresh memory, and gentrification had not yet arrived. Tenements seemed to burn daily. But the frontierlike nature of the neighborhood and the availability of cheap rent encouraged an explosion of creativity.

    Mr. Rose decided the time was worth documenting, and for about a year the two men photographed the local landscape. People appear in those frames, but they are rarely the focus. Mr. Rose and Mr. Fausty instead concentrated on the structures and shapes that made up the neighborhood, including bridges, empty lots and buildings with bricked-up windows.

    “I really am interested in the spatial quality of where we live,” Mr. Rose said recently, adding that he was drawn to “the buildings we occupy and the physical containers that are critical to who we are.”

    Around 2010, Mr. Rose began documenting the neighborhood a second time, again using a view camera and sometimes seeking out the same spots he visited in 1980. Images from both projects have been made into a book called “Time and Space on the Lower East Side,” and on Thursday, an exhibition of pictures from the book will open at the Dillon Gallery in Chelsea.

    As the photographs show, much on the Lower East Side has changed over 30 years. But Mr. Rose sees an element of permanence in the physical grid of the area that has endured for a century or more. “I think this way we tend to look at things, as before and after, is really simplistic,” he said. “People should think more about the continuum.”

    https://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/03/n...east-side.html

  3. #3

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    Still Gritty, not as dirty as the 70's imo. Wish i had visited then though, make you appreciate how good things are now?

  4. #4

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    Anyone know from which intersection the seventh photo down was taken?

    The optical place is still there, neat-o.

  5. #5
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    South side of Delancey, at Clinton:

    http://goo.gl/maps/CivOn

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    Take a Drive Through the ‘Gritty’ 1980s East Village




    http://www.boweryboogie.com/2013/08/...wery+Boogie%29

  8. #8

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    Ho, ly, crap. Imagine all the lucky dogs who bought up all that crumbling real estate? Btw that looked like the Baruch houses near where that smoking van was sitting. Not sure.

  9. #9
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    The Drag Queen Stroll: Jeff Cowen and 1980s New York City

    by Joe Festa Jeff Cowen, a contemporary art photographer born in New York City, is best known for his portraits and collages, and a painterly approach to his photographic process. Five gelatin silver prints by Cowen are housed within the Photographer File here at New-York Historical Society. Taken early in the artist’s career, these images illustrate Cowen’s artistic practice prior to his formal study at the Art Students League and New York Studio School. They also shed light on New York City’s fringe counter-cultures of the 1980s – specifically, transgender prostitutes living and working in Manhattan’s Meatpacking District.


    Jeff Cowen, Untitled, ca. 1980-1989. Gelatin Silver Print. Photographer File, PR50


    Jeff Cowen, Untitled, ca. 1980-1989. Gelatin Silver Print. Photographer File, PR50.

    When New-York Historical acquired these images, Jeff Cowen included a typewritten, four-page narrative he titled “The Drag Queen Stroll.” In it, the artist details his subjects from their first-hand accounts and his point of view, utilizing an abrupt writing style that’s reminiscent of the Beat Generation.

    Cowen maps “The Stroll” from 17th Street and 9th Avenue, running west to the Hudson River, to the southern edge of the Meatpacking District on Gansevoort. His writing draws on the rampant homelessness, drug use, prostitution, theft, and assault in this area at night, which serves as a sharp contrast to the union workers and family men who work in the meat markets and warehouses during the day. Cowen calls this area “a haven for the largest transvestite subculture on the east coast.” And with the advent of crack and HIV/AIDS in the 1980s, he says “the cost of sin has never been higher.”

    In the late 1980s, around the time these images were taken, Cowen was working as assistant to artist Larry Clark. Clark, a photographer known for his controversial and provocative imagery, gained notoriety in 1971 through the publication of his art book Tulsa, and later made mainstream headlines with the release of his film Kids (1995) – two works that share a strong undercurrent of drug use and its consequences.

    Like Clark, Cowen brings the harsh realities of urban youth and New York City to the surface, and infuses his images with raw, human emotion. Alongside the artist’s written narrative, these five images demonstrate Cowen’s ability to speak bluntly about drugs, sex, and AIDS, while juxtaposing heavy subject matter with fleeting elements of tenderness and beauty. This emotive quality has since become central to his photographic mission, and remains evident in the artist’s recent work focusing on the human form.

    http://blog.nyhistory.org/the-drag-q...new-york-city/

  10. #10
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Stache hasn't aged a bit

  11. #11
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    I attribute it to clean living and Human Growth Hormone!

  12. #12
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Don't forget your timeless sense of fashion!

  13. #13
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    All you really need is a Danskin top and a pair of house slippers -

  14. #14

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    The buildings are virtually untouched over 30 years later.

    Side note; the new Google Maps is awesome.
    Last edited by IrishInNYC; September 19th, 2013 at 11:03 AM.

  15. #15

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    42nd St/Times Square area in 1983. Disney-ization was still years away. From American Classic Images (try to ignore the watermarks)



















    Looking south on Broadway

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